radio tracking

radio tracking

[′rād·ē·ō ′trak·iŋ]
(engineering)
The process of keeping a radio or radar beam set on a target and determining the range of the target continuously.
References in periodicals archive ?
This is made possible by integrating the GPS satellite location with Wi-Fi location, Bluetooth and radio tracking.
Our space collaboration with the United States of America began in 1957 with the establishment of a radio tracking facility in Woomera and was formalised in 1960 with the signing of a bi-lateral treaty on space vehicle tracking.
After 383 days of radio tracking, 43 percent of largemouth bass and 56 percent of smallmouth bass with transmitters had left the bay.
74) Professor Etienne Benson wrote that researchers became enamored with radio telemetry: "Wedding Americans' fascination with the wild to their equally fervent enthusiasm for technology, the rise of radio tracking as the privileged mode of knowing wild animals seemed both ironic and inevitable.
For example, many Angelenos believe that coyotes come from the park to haunt the city, but radio tracking suggests that some don't frequent the park at all.
Standard radio tracking methods were used, namely eye reflection, direct observation, and radio signals (White & Garrot 1990, Marby & Stamps 2008).
Radio tracking in the study of bovine tuberculosis in badgers.
During his four-day visit, his Royal Highness will witness vets at work in the field as they fit radio tracking collars to elephants to help with research and conservation.
Accordingly, this book will be a valuable reference (in more than 1000 hours of radio tracking wolves and moose, I have witnessed only three wolfprey interactions).
Dr Martyn Lucas and Jeroen Tummers from Durham University's Behaviour, Ecology and Evolution Research Centre, tagged 25 sea trout with radio tracking devices.
By combining LiDAR with other technologies, (such as digital maps and the radio tracking of moving sensors), information rich 3D maps can be made and new opportunities to discover, analyse and share information result.
Depending on study population and habitat characteristics, radio tracking can increase search efficiency over other approaches, such as walking transects (Refsnider et al.