radioactive debris

radioactive debris

[¦rād·ē·ō′ak·tiv də′brē]
(nucleonics)
Radioactive material which is carried through the air from the site of a nuclear explosion.
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References in periodicals archive ?
1961 - Cloud of radioactive debris moves across central Siberia after Soviets explode what is called biggest man-made nuclear bomb.
Since May 2011, the liquidators have been conducting a cleanup of radioactive debris and have been patrolling the territory around the cisterns full of contaminated water.
The perpetrators appeared clueless to the fact that certain weather conditions would have concentrated the radioactive debris in the Palestinian-majority West Bank.
Its review looked at dangerous work faced by plant workers such as removing nuclear fuel assemblies from reactors, and a future clean up of radioactive debris.
There is instead an apparent global conspiracy of authorities of all sorts to deny to the public reliably accurate, comprehensible, independently verifiable (where possible), and comprehensive information about not only the condition of the Fukushima power plant itself and its surrounding communities, but about the unceasing, uncontrolled release of radioactive debris into the air and water, creating a constantly increasing risk of growing harm to the global community.
In terms of the risk to public health, however, one must consider the possibility of a launch accident such as the destruction of a launch vehicle prior to leaving the earth's gravitation or its breakup shortly after launch, scattering radioactive debris.
It did not do so with sarin gas or mustard gas, but with solvents, toxic metals, hazardous liquids, corrosive materials, infectious hospital waste and radioactive debris from scrap military equipment.
Radioactive debris is of concern because the tsunami caused reactor meltdowns at the Fukushima nuclear power plant.
ABLE seaman Bill Clarkson was ordered to live close to the blast site for weeks to clear radioactive debris.
It's 26 years since the Chernobyl reactor exploded and caught fire, releasing enormous amounts of radioactive debris.
The fuel basin contained fuel, radioactive components and radioactive debris accumulated over the course of many years of plant operation.
Gomel lies just 80 miles from Chernobyl and was among many neighbouring towns and cities to be contaminated with radioactive debris following the nuclear power plant disaster in 1986.