crosstie

(redirected from railroad tie)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.

crosstie

[′krȯs‚tī]
(engineering)
A timber or metal sill placed transversely under the rails of a railroad, tramway, or mine-car track.
References in periodicals archive ?
COTTAGE GROVE - Where there's smoke there's fire, and where there's fire there just might be burning railroad ties.
The firm, which was founded in 1986, manufactures pre-stressed concrete railroad ties and turnout ties for Class I railroads, commuter passenger operations, transit authorities and industrial operations.
There, I dropped the railroad tie and shuffled off around the corner of the chicken house before stopping to pull my pants back up.
DSM supplies three grades of Arnitel for railroad tie pads.
The demand for wood railroad ties has grown with the railroad industry, and there is no reason to think that this demand will not continue to grow for many decades to come.
Marc Shea, president of Primix Corporation and inventor of the composite railroad tie has issued the following statement:
Richard Lampo, a materials engineer with the Army Corps of Engineers' Research Laboratories, agrees that the potential of plastic composite railroad ties is significant.
Using 100%-recycled consumer and industrial plastics, AXION develops, markets and sells its recycled structural composite products through its ECOTRAX[R] composite railroad tie and STRUXURE[R] building material lines.
The plant will be able to season, treat and distribute up to 2 million railroad ties per year, the same volume as at the company's current plant in Montevallo.
Workers are starting to clean up acres of dumped railroad ties from in and around a west Eugene pond.
Wood Energy, one of the nation's largest railroad tie reclamation and energy generation operations, entered into a five year lease at the Iron Bridge Road facility.
There are literally hundreds of applications that could benefit from this technology, and our goal is to protect them so Axion can effectively monetize their various uses for building materials, as well as railroad tie products and beyond.