raised beach


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raised beach

[′rāzd ′bēch]
(geology)
An ancient beach raised to a level above the present shoreline by uplift or by lowering of the sea level; often bounded by inland cliffs.
References in periodicals archive ?
1), two observers surveyed raised beach sequences and other terrain from all-terrain vehicles between 12 and 30 July 2007 and between 7 July and 8 August 2008.
He plotted frequency of dwellings by elevation and showed peak abundance on raised beach levels that are probably of early Pre-Dorset age.
1996) studied a raised beach level in the central part of the Bay of Biscay coast, dated to 71.
For example, Sanjaume and Tolgensbakk (2009) examined raised beach ridges on the Varanger Peninsula in Arctic Norway and concluded that differences in the number of ridges between sites could be explained by intrinsic factors such as wave energy, beach and offshore gradient, volume of sediment supply, size of sediments, and coastal evolution with strong self-organization.
We focus on the changes with elevation in the abundance of dwelling features on raised beach sequences--a proxy for age--and on individual dwelling sizes, as well as on overall site sizes and characteristics.
I watched one probing around a rocky raised beach at Cape Rhir, in Morocco, only a few short weeks ago - I wondered momentarily if that bird was among the flock I watched on the mosses, as lapwings tumbled overhead and whitethroats sang from blooming hawthorns nearby.
They are monitoring whether a rock wall jutting into the sea is protecting Colwyn Bay's newly raised beach - as onlookers questioned whether one solitary rock wall, or groyne, is enough.
With Richard Emmerick of Philadelphia and Father Guy Mary-Rousseliere of Churchill, Manitoba, he explored Arctic prehistory on the raised beach terraces of Fury and Hecla Strait, now considered a classic location within Palaeo-Eskimo archaeology.
Range extensions at any particular site are represented by intervals of relative bone abundance, whereas range retractions are represented by bone scarcity or absence in raised beach sequences.
Of the few proxy sources for the interpretation of sea ice history in the Canadian Arctic Archipelago (CAA), fossil bowhead whale remains on raised beach sequences are particularly useful, in part because the remains are regionally either abundant, rare, or absent in deposits of certain ages.
All the sites are on Igloolik Island, Nunavut, Canada, on raised beach dominated by cushion plants, and represent a polar semidesert type of vegetation (Svoboda, 1977).
Local driftwood chronologies that reflect the variable abundance of wood in raised beach sequences (e.