random mating


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random mating

[′ran·dəm ‚mād·iŋ]
(genetics)
A mating system in which there is an equal opportunity for all male and female gametes to join in fertilization.
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References in periodicals archive ?
DISCUSSION--Genetic Variability Within Subpopulations--A lack of significant differences between observed heterozygosity and expected heterozygosity suggests random mating and nonsignificant levels of inbreeding in all three subpopulations.
is] which measures the deviation from random mating, was negative and close to zero implying a small amount of mating between subpopulations, which helped to minimize inbreeding.
2] or backcross, comprised ten generations of random mating of the population cross followed by two generations of selfing.
no distinction between the correlations of genes within and among individuals), it does not allow for an estimation of departure from random mating, as is done in the above ANOVA analysis.
Diaz-Fleischer & Arredondo (2011) demonstrated that divergent wavelengths provoked sensory system differences that, in turn, reduced random mating in Mexican fruit flies, Anastrepha ludens (Loew) (Diptera: Tephritidae), that originated from environments of variable light regimes.
Inbreeding coefficients, co-ancestry coefficients, the expected inbreeding under random mating and the deviation from random mating were calculated using Evolutionary Algorithm for Mate Selection (Berg, 2012).
1997) theorized that the large GD between the SS progenitors and its Cycle 0 was not inherent in the original population, but formed as a result of the continual random mating necessary to maintain the cycles.
Expected probability of male philopatry under a hypothesis of random mating is the probability that a male will pair with a female that returns to his natal colony or will pair with a female that immigrates to his natal colony.
socius females mated with heterospecific males according to random mating frequencies, with the exception of cages A3, B1, B3, and C2.
There has been considerable deviation of the actual inbreeding coefficient from expected inbreeding under random mating in each breed in the past decade (Figure 5).
However, it is widely recognized that deviations from random mating can be caused by two different biological factors: discrimination and mating propensity (see Spieth and Ringo 1983).
Slatkin (1980) modeled the genetics by assuming that random mating results in normal character distributions in each generation.