raptorial


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raptorial

[rap′tȯr·ē·əl]
(zoology)
Living on prey.
Adapted for snatching or seizing prey, as birds of prey.
References in periodicals archive ?
It grasps onto vegetation using its hindlimbs, which leaves its raptorial forelimbs available to seize passing prey (personal observation in a laboratory setting).
Mientras los nauplios y primeros estadios de desarrollo de los copepoditos del orden Cyclopoida son filtradores y predominantemente herbivoros, los ultimos estadios de los copepoditos y los adultos tienen habito raptorial y son predominantemente carnivoros [13], y de acuerdo con Edmondson [14], la alta proporcion de formas inmaduras de copepodos es el resultado de la reproduccion continua de estos organismos en regiones tropicales, y la alta densidad de nauplios en relacion con los copepodos adultos puede ser un indicador de una alta tasa de mortalidad durante las diferentes etapas de desarrollo de estos organismos [15].
Morbidity and mortality in free-living raptorial birds of northern California: a retrospective study.
Raptorial birds of the orders Accipitriformes, Falconiformes, and Strigiformes constitute a well-known charismatic functional group of terrestrial animals, which have been popular monitoring objects for decades (Newton, 1979; Kovacs et al.
The scientific investigator cannot deduce from that principle the fact that raptorial birds are carnivores any more than he could deduce the observed morphology of such birds from the principle.
Moreover, the poet's perception of the raptorial nature of US imperialism is poeticized in the following manner:
Abstract: Behavioral ecology of red-tailed hawks, rough-legged hawks, harriers, Kestrels, and other raptorial birds wintering in south central Ohio.
He and his fellow researchers published their findings in Nature under the title "The giant bite of a new raptorial sperm whale from the Miocene epoch of Peru.
bennettii is a relative big abrocomidae rodent (>80 g) being eaten in central Chile by raptorial birds such as Athene cunicularia and carnivores such as Lycalopex culpaeus (Meserve et al.
These distances correspond to 45% to 50% of the length of the raptorial legs, and are thus clearly within the working range of the legs.
The spines on the raptorial forelimbs are long and needlelike, compared to the fine comb appearance of species such as Hymenopus coronatus, the orchid mantis.