rarefaction wave

rarefaction wave

[¦rer·ə¦fak·shən ‚wāv]
(fluid mechanics)
A pressure wave or rush of air or water induced by rarefaction; it travels in the opposite direction to that of a shock wave directly following an explosion. Also known as suction wave.

expansion wave

expansion waveclick for a larger image
In supersonic flow, expansion waves occur when bodies begin to narrow, making more space available. In passing through an expansion wave, air velocity increases, while temperature and pressures are reduced. A simple wave or progressive disturbance in the isentropic flow of a compressible fluid, such that the pressure and density of a fluid particle decrease on crossing the wave in the direction of its motion. It is the opposite of a compression wave. Also called a rarefaction wave. See also compression wave.
References in periodicals archive ?
the two rarefaction wave curves can be expressed, respectively, by
It is clear to see that both of the rarefaction wave curves are straight lines in the (u, [rho]) phase plane.
In this case, we turn our attention to the situation that the Riemann solution is a shock wave followed by a rarefaction wave starting from the initial point ([x.
6] is able to catch up with the wave back of the rarefaction wave [R.
6] is given by (33) and that of the wave back in the rarefaction wave [R.
0], 0) is a rarefaction wave followed by a shock wave.
4] to denote the rarefaction wave and the shock wave, respectively.
2] is able to penetrate the whole rarefaction wave [R.
2] is given by (23) and that of the wave back in the rarefaction wave [R.
That is to say, the rarefaction wave accelerates when it passes through the shock wave [S.
Depending upon the spacing between the systems (between woofer or subwoofer driver centers), at some bass frequency the rarefaction wave from one woofer or subwoofer will reach the other woofer or subwoofer just as it is generating a pressure wave.
Propagation of rarefaction waves in bubble flow with evaporation.