rate of climb


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rate of climb

[′rāt əv ′klīm]
(aerospace engineering)
Ascent of aircraft per unit time, usually expressed as feet per minute.

rate of climb

The rate of gain of vertical height per unit of time (i.e., feet/minute or meters/second). The rate of climb is normally calculated when an aircraft is climbing at its specified climbing speed and not in zoom climb. In helicopters, there are two rates of climb: the maximum rate of climb and the maximum vertical rate of climb. A vertical speed indicator (VSI) shows the rate of climb.
References in periodicals archive ?
We also like the mods for twins that increase single-engine rate of climb.
net) claims that its Speed Covers for the main landing gear of several models of 400-series Cessnas reduce fuel burn 5-10 percent, increase single-engine rate of climb 25 percent and should increase cruise speeds.
As the airplane climbed, the delta in rates of climb between the flights increased--a 421 tends to run out of puff above FL210--and the modified airplane's rate of climb was nearly double that of the unmodified airplane above FL200.
Wingspan - 40ft Length - 31ft 4ins Height - 13ft 1in Engine - Rolls-Royce Merlin III 12-cylinder with liquid cooling Power - 1,130hp Maximum Speed - 328mph at 20,000ft Rate of climb - 2750ft/min Range - 505 miles Service Ceiling - 34,200ft Armament - Eight 0.
In fact, for several combinations of landing gear and flap deployment, as well as for the wind-milling propeller, a positive rate of climb cannot be achieved; a disappointing rate of descent occurs.
As with any airplane, whether single-or multi-engine, landing gear retraction should occur only after achieving a positive rate of climb and not before a safe, straight-ahead landing on the remaining runway, overrun or clear area is impossible.
Customers have reported an increased rate of climb in before and after flights.
The claimed speed benefit varies among the airplane types, however, LoPresti said the improvement tended to be about 3 MPH with some boost in rate of climb.
The reduced rate of climb was attributed to atmospheric conditions, the aircraft being over its gross takeoff weight, reduced power in the right engine, and the decision not to use available turbochargers.
The pilot-in-command reported that, after takeoff and obtaining a positive rate of climb, he selected the gear-up handle.
The basic formula is that the rate of climb in feet per minute equals the climb rate in feet per mile multiplied by the result of dividing the groundspeed by 60.
See the sidebar above for information on which airspeed to use when trying to maintain your airplane's best rate of climb.