rathole


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rathole

[′rat‚hōl]
(mining engineering)
A shallow, small-diameter, auxiliary hole alongside the main borehole, drilled at an angle to the main hole; after core drilling is completed, the rathole is reamed out and the larger-size hole is advanced, usually by some noncoring method.
References in periodicals archive ?
Organiser Dan Lynch, who runs the podcast and internet radio show Rathole Radio, said: "We want to give people the chance to talk about what they care about.
When we subsidized Pease (International Tradeport), it looked like government pouring money down a rathole.
Or the product may rathole - flow from the center of the container only - leaving product packed against the sides.
Perhaps he was a rabbi but in a rathole town needed a solid job.
Advised that it was pointless for him to try to match the local coverage of the New York Times because its enormous staff had a man to watch every rathole in the city, Stanley Walker characteristically responded that the Herald Tribune would succeed by assigning a rat to watch every manhole.
In the words of the editor, the two fragments (which have English subtitles, "The Magical Place" and "The Worst Rathole I Ever Visited?
Investors, for example, aren't generally interested in pouring their money down a rathole.
According to the subhead, "Haste, waste, mismanagement and outright graft are making a multibillion-dollar rathole out of the Federal Highway Program.
I could have continued on with the way the park was, but eventually I would have gone down the rathole," says Wong.
0 million for the assets of Rathole Drilling ("RDI") which will allow us to drill our own foundation shafts for projects.
The majority of our federal budget is going down a rathole.