reality principle


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reality principle

[rē′al·əd·ē ‚prin·sə·pəl]
(psychology)
The concept that the pleasure principle is normally modified by the demands of the external environment and that the individual adjusts to these inescapable requirements so that he ultimately secures satisfaction of his instinctual wishes.
References in periodicals archive ?
12) This motive is at odds with the reality principle, however, which demands recognition of the disagreeable constraints of our fragile and decaying bodies, the hostile forces of external nature, and the opposing actions and interests of other people.
Marcuse's analysis of the subtractive, socially produced, sexual body informs his view of the importance of sexual pleasure in establishing a new reality principle that will promote human freedom.
In Freudian terms, the trajectory of Marcial's development--as is evident in the following summary--can be described as a movement away from the domination of the reality principle towards pleasure that becomes play under the influence of the pleasure principle: Marcial's wife, the Marquise of Capellanias drowns under suspicious circumstances in the river Almendares.
As much as he carries with him his own portable fantasia (the girls, the drinks), Bond is an agent not of the British Secret Service but of some deflating reality principle, and in a slight way you hate him for it.
the Reality Principle," a follow-up ETC article to his "Sexual Fantasy and the 1957 Car.
In his 1930 book Civilization and Its Discontents, Freud discusses the concepts of the pleasure principle and the reality principle.
In its attachment to recognizable conventions, such leisure-based autonomy owes much to the late Freud's notion of the reality principle according to which individuation is a compromise based on the acceptance of the social necessity of autonomous subjectivity.
We are the most loving and responsible versions of the Reality Principle that they will ever encounter.
For Ory, Medina shows ways the reality principle collided with the pleasure principle.
But even here Max as father figure suggests Bigger's psychological and political development: Unlike the punishing father/fuhrer figure who contributes to his omnipotent fantasies, the nurturing Max teaches Bigger how to think about his feelings and actions; and, more importantly, he teaches the hard lesson of the reality principle concerning the slow process of collective social change.
In this way one takes the first step towards the introduction of the reality principle which is to dominate future development.