rear-view mirror


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rear-view mirror

a mirror on a motor vehicle enabling the driver to see traffic coming behind him or her
References in periodicals archive ?
Cadillac, a subsidiary of General Motors Corporation (NYSE: GM), is equipping its Cadillac CT6 luxury sedan with a high-definition video rear-view mirror.
Contract notice: Rear-view mirrors integrated camera purchase.
Meanwhile, the penetration rate of folding rear-view mirror and memory rear-view mirror in the Chinese passenger vehicle market improved by 1.
In another digital first, the electronic rear-view mirror will feature in the R8 e-tron, the road-going, battery-powered version of the R8 two-seat sports car due to appear in its production form later this year - but this has not yet confirmed for Australia.
Owners also have the option of an advanced HDD sat nav combined with Lexus' Remote Touch control, an auto-dimming rear-view mirror, back guide monitor and 10-speaker audio package.
There are hidey holes and cubbies galore, while a clever innovation comes in the shape of an extra rear-view mirror, allowing both driver and front passenger to see all the car's occupants.
Windscreens should not contain anything over 10mm in the area below the rear-view mirror.
The 36-year-old was looking in the rear-view mirror while carrying out her high-speed dental clean-up.
In the rear-view mirror, however, I saw that the driver of the car behind me was so engrossed in the conversation she was having with the lady in the front passenger seat that she appeared to be largely oblivious of what was going on around her.
2-litre petrol Dynamic, the Mamy comes with a second internal rear-view mirror for viewing any children on the rear seat, bag hooks in the boot, trendy new front seat covers with pockets at the back, washable front and rear seat upholstery, orange air-vent surrounds and special carpet mats with a high grip mat in the boot.
The remark draws a quizzical look, via rear-view mirror, from Rome, the most rotten of the evil diamond thieves.
We look at the present through a rear-view mirror," Marshall McLuhan wrote in The Medium Is the Massage: An Inventory of Effects (1967), arguing that radical shifts in contemporary experience often go unarticulated because people remain attached to "the flavor of the most recent past"--and so in life recognize only the persistent afterimage of a familiar but disappeared world.