care

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CARE

(Cooperative for Assistance and Relief Everywhere), nonprofit, nonsectarian federation of agencies devoted to channeling relief and self-help materials to needy people in foreign countries. Organized in the United States (1945) to help war-ravaged Europe, CARE soon expanded its program to include developing nations in Asia, Africa, and Latin America. Famous for its "CARE packages" of food and other necessities, CARE in now also involved in population, health care, land management, and small economic activity. It is now an international organization with 10 member countries and headquarters in Brussels.

care

  1. the work involved in supporting people who, because of physical frailty chronic illness or other forms of incapacity and disability, are incapable of leading an autonomous existence.
  2. other kinds of carework, e.g. in child-rearing (see CHILD CARE) and DOMESTIC LABOUR. This should be distinguished from care in sense 1.
Care in sense 1 operates over a wide range of social relations. A clear dividing line can be drawn between formal and informal care (see Abrams, 1978) as it exists in contemporary industrial societies. Formal care refers to services provided by agents of organization (statutory, voluntary and/or private) to people within clearly defined categories of need. Informal care is personally directed towards certain people who have a social relationship with their carer - usually a family member, and most often a spouse (Parker, 1993), or female relative.

Feminist sociologists (see also FEMINISM) have had a major impact on the understanding of care and caring relationships. They have argued that caring is ‘a gendered concept’ and that women constitute the majority of carers both informally, in the private sphere, and as low-paid care workers (‘care assistants’) in the formal sector (Finch and Groves, 1982; Ungerson, 1987; Lewis and Meredith, 1988). Studies of caring have examined the complex reasons why women care and the particular problems and difficulties they face. Social policies involving decarceration and COMMUNITY CARE, the decline of neighbour-hood and COMMUNITY associated with increasing SOCIAL (and geographical) MOBILITY, have placed an increasing burden on individual women carers. There is some evidence that women are reluctant to enter caring relationships with female relatives but lack viable alternatives (Cotterill, 1994). Recent research using data from the 1980 British General Household Survey has also pointed to the significant contribution made by male carers, particularly men who care for their wives (Arber and Gilbert, 1989).

care, custody, and control

Describes a standard exclusion in liability insurance policies. Under this exclusion, the liability insurance does not apply to damage to property in the care or custody of the insured, or to damage to property over which the insured is for any purpose exercising physical control.

CARE

agency devoted to channeling relief to needy people abroad. [Am. Hist.: NCE, 456]

care

in (or into) care Social welfare made the legal responsibility of a local authority by order of a court
References in periodicals archive ?
57) Even though other New England states have demonstrated successful implementation of the reasonable care standard, there are still a few concerns that may plague Massachusetts landowners, such as how their homeowner's insurance will be affected by this new standard.
exercise reasonable care, is not fully aligned with the element of
The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) brought the prosecution against Cotterill, who denied failing to supervise the pool with reasonable care.
While some courts find having a written policy is reasonable care per se, Utah's courts have not so held, but one Utah judge called a written policy "a powerful indication that the employer is at least taking reasonable preventative measures.
Reduce your company's risk of liability by properly and effectively providing guest protection and reasonable care.
The council only has a duty of reasonable care in this case.
The revised ethics ruling also clarifies that disclosing confidential client information to a third-party service provider for the purpose of providing professional services to clients or for administrative support purposes would not be in violation of Rule 301, "Confidential Client Information"; however, the member would be required to enter into a contractual agreement with the third-party service provider to maintain the confidentiality of the client's information, and use reasonable care in determining that the third-party service provider has appropriate procedures in place to prevent the unauthorized release of confidential client information.
Typical is a federal court's holding that an underwriter conducting due diligence must show that it "did not know, and in the exercise of reasonable care, could not have known, of [the] untruth or omission" of the investor disclosure in question (Software Toolworks Sec.
The duty to exercise reasonable care and skill in determining whether he or she should discontinue his or her treatment arises only if the medical provider has, in fact, begun treatment.
However, if the harassment does not involve one of these tangible actions, an employer may be able to limit or avoid liability by showing that he/she exercised reasonable care to prevent and correct any harassing behavior in a timely fashion and that the employee then unreasonably failed to take advantage of any preventive or corrective actions provided by the employer to remedy harm.
You would have to show he acted in a way no reasonable solicitor exercising reasonable care would have acted and thereby caused you loss.
Out theory in the case," said attorney David Gottesman of Nashua, who represented Boyer's mother, "was that the defendants did not use reasonable care in disseminating information about an individual and gave the individual no warning, and did little if any checking to verify how this information was going to be used.