rebreather


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rebreather

[rē′brēth·ər]
(engineering)
A closed-loop oxygen supply system consisting of gas supply and face mask.
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In the summer of 1999, I organized a two-day private conference in Berkeley, California, inviting nine associates in the right-to-die field (from Canada, the United States and Australia) to a demonstration of the helium technique, plus we introduced another device called a DeBreather based on the technology for Rebreathers developed for underwater explorers.
The surface classroom includes a rebreather lab with an oxygen cascade system, bench testing equipment, dryer and multi-gas testing instruments.
Nikolai Baumann, owner of diving centre The Dive Connection and PADI Course Director and Tech and Rebreather instructor has lived in EL Gouna since 1997.
About 12 years ago I moved onto using a mixed gas rebreather system, which extends diving times even further.
UK chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear (CBRN) respiratory protection solutions specialist Avon Rubber plc (LON:AVON) said it had taken over diving rebreather systems and dive computers provider VR Technology.
Between 1870 and 1970, American scientists, inventors and scholars concocted a myriad of modern-day marvels, from the rebreather (a type of breathing set that provides a breathing gas mix of oxygen and recycled exhaled gas), the telephone, the radio and photographic film to the airplane, manufacturing assembly line, nuclear power, and the Internet.
Members of the Triage Team (TT) wore hospital scrubs and used nursing clinical packs containing gauze dressings, sterile water, tape, bandage scissors, saline, gloves, lace masks, pen lights, and rebreather masks.
Open-circuit systems allow a diver to breathe through a tank, while a closed-circuit system recycles the diver's air through a rebreather.
A rebreather is an electromechanical device that can provide breathing gas through infusion of oxygen and recycling of carbon dioxide through the use of a chemical scrubber (Figures 1 and 2).
Subsequent medical examination revealed a distressed patient (sinus tachycardia 144 beats per minute, respiratory rate 24 breaths per minute, blood pressure 119/62 mmHg) with signs of central cyanosis, and persistently low pulse oximetry readings fluctuating between 80% and 90% despite the patient being on a rebreather oxygen mask.
One irksome issue needs noting: There is an entire page extolling the wonder of CCRs (closed-circuit rebreather units), which recycle a diver's exhaled air so that bubbles are not released into the water.
Mr Spencer was an "experienced mixed gas and closed circuit rebreather diver" who had been on three previous missions to film the Britannic.