receiver


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receiver

1. a person appointed by a court to manage property pending the outcome of litigation, during the infancy of the owner, or after the owner(s) has been declared bankrupt or of unsound mind
2. Chiefly Brit a person who receives stolen goods knowing that they have been stolen
3. the equipment in a telephone, radio, or television that receives incoming electrical signals or modulated radio waves and converts them into the original audio or video signals
4. the equipment in a radar system, radio telescope, etc., that converts incoming radio signals into a useful form, usually displayed on the screen of a cathode-ray oscilloscope
5. Chem a vessel in which the distillate is collected during distillation

receiver

An electronic device that, in radio astronomy, detects and measures the radio-frequency signals picked up by the antenna of a radio telescope. A receiver that measures the total noise power from the antenna and from itself is called a total-power receiver. This is in distinction to other types that measure, for example, the correlated power in two antennas (see correlation receiver; Dicke-switched receiver; phase-switching interferometer).

Radio-astronomy receivers usually use the superheterodyne technique: the radio-frequency signals at frequency f 1 are combined in a mixer with signals from a local oscillator at frequency f 0 to produce a combination signal whose amplitude faithfully follows that of the radio-frequency signal but whose frequency is f 1f 0. This is the intermediate frequency, IF , which is amplified in the IF amplifier and presented to the first detector. The output of the nonlinear detector is a voltage that depends on the input power.

In a total-power receiver the output from the detector becomes the receiver output, having first been smoothed by a low-pass filter to reduce the fluctuations due to the system noise (see sensitivity). In a switching receiver the first detector output is passed to a phase-sensitive detector before smoothing in order to pick out the component at the switching frequency that is buried in the noise. See also line receiver.

Receiver

 

a vessel for collecting gas or vapor whose inlet and outlet are of smaller cross section than pipes employed in the whole unit. Receivers also serve to smooth variations in pressure brought about by a pulsating feed and periodic withdrawal. In compressors, receivers are also used to cool the gas and to separate drops of oil and moisture carried in the gas. In steam engines, receivers are thermally insulated pipes that connect the high- and low-pressure cylinders.

receiver

[ri′sē·vər]
(chemical engineering)
Vessel, container, or tank used to receive and collect liquid material from a process unit, such as the distillate receiver from the overhead condenser of a distillation column.
(electronics)
The complete equipment required for receiving modulated radio waves and converting them into the original intelligence, such as into sounds or pictures, or converting to desired useful information as in a radar receiver.
(mechanical engineering)
An apparatus placed near the compressor to equalize the pulsations of the air as it comes from the compressor to cause a more uniform flow of air through the pipeline and to collect moisture and oil carried in the air.

receiver

(1) A device that accepts signals. Contrast with "transmitter," which sends signals. The term is used generically to refer to "the side being sent to." For example, "by the time the signal gets to the receiver..." refers to whichever hardware device is at the other end of the communication.

(2) A unit of audio or audio/video equipment that serves as the primary control for a stereo or home theater system. See stereo receiver, A/V receiver and head unit.
References in periodicals archive ?
1 Receiver lid--allows access to the receiver chamber.
Concurrent with the offering of polymer receivers was a new innovation known as a "jig-less" 80% receiver.
However, he should not be aligned any deeper than 9 and nothing shorter than 6 yards from the receiver.
Stepping onto the field with an 11-year veteran receiver that developed aching relationships with quarterbacks Donovan McNabb in Philadelphia and Jeff Garcia in San Francisco doesn't worry the Cowboys' Drew Bledsoe.
Examples include a long list of products well known to those who have followed the evolution of agricultural GPS: AgGPS[R] TrimFlight aerial guidance system; AgGPS 132 Flightbar; AgGPS 120 GPS receiver; AgGPS 122 receiver; AgGPS 132 receiver; AgGPS 170 Field Computer; AgGPS 106 Smart Antenna; AgGPS 252 receiver with AgGPS 900 radio; EZ-Guide[R] lightbar; AgGPS Autopilot autosteering system; and many other agricultural GPS application "firsts.
When we we're in the big Sandbox, we used some commercial GPS receivers and they seem to have several advantages over the PLGR--smaller, lighter, easier to operate, included maps and used AA batteries.
The EZ-Stream Universal Wireless Multimedia Receiver can distribute even the most demanding multimedia--streaming video--throughout the home, without wires.
If AAF receivers are used, the receiver compensation level can only be read back.
Since GPS satellites orbit in a predictable path around Earth, Birnbach's receiver was always aware of its location in relation to the satellites.
The receiver wrote a letter to the foreclosing bank stating that although the property had been secured as well as possible, and the gas, water and electricity turned off and the water pipes drained, since there were no tenants or occupants in the apartments, the doors and windows should be bordered up to avoid vandalism.
Receivers later sat at a computer displaying a random sequence of the target image and three decoys.
PCTEL will showcase the new SeeGull EX WCDMA/HSDPA/GSM scanning receiver along with its other scanning receiver products and its entire portfolio of wireless broadband solutions at the 3GSM World Congress in Barcelona, Spain.

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