recent

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recent

[′rē·sənt]
(evolution)
Referring to taxa which still exist; the antonym of fossil.

Recent

[′rē·sənt]
(geology)
References in periodicals archive ?
Primacy and recency effects in serial-position curves of immediate recall.
The recency bias typically follows major news cycles--"so you could see it happening in the middle of the year as much as it's happening right now"--but it's key for advisors to talk their clients through the tendency to be in the moment, he said.
The following analysis of the problematic scenes will employ Shlomith Rimmon-Kenan's concept of recency to demonstrate the fusion of pornographic and horror conventions, and to argue that the significance of these scenes lies in the way they rewrite what immediately preceded them for the reader.
Some improvement on LRU, such as LRU-K and 2Q, attempts to enhance LRU capacity by making use of the additional historical information about previous block references other than only the recency information used in LRU had been suggested in some of the previous research works.
Based solely on your Baron recency of experience, are you night current in the Cirrus?
The images were presented contiguously and simultaneously on the computer screen, but would be subject to a left-right bias that would have promoted a recency effect for the form on the right side of the screen.
Three model variations are illustrated using purchasing data from over 2,300 customers from a sample from a CDNOW dataset: a recency only model, a recency and frequency model, and a full RFM model.
Gruber (1987) proposed the recency effect as the framework for extending Baldwin and Howard's (1983) study.
For data analysis, the average, range and standard deviation for reading level, font size, recency, production quality and content were determined.
In the case above, the problem is a decision bias called the recency effect--the most recent piece of information people received played a disproportionate role in their judgment.
Officers here have advised him that he can challenge that decision and request temporary accommodation whilst that challenge is made but that it is unlikely that HBBC will have a fresh duty to provide emergency accommodation given the recency of Coventry's decision.
Such problems as recency bias, the halo or horn effect, the Pygmalion effect, and pigeonholing must be addressed head on.