reception

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reception

Brit
a. the first class in an infant school
b. a class in a school designed to receive new immigrants, esp those whose knowledge of English is poor
c. (as modifier): a reception teacher

Reception

(religion, spiritualism, and occult)

Reception is an older term for a relationship between two planets in which one is located in a sign ruled by the other. For example, Mars in Taurus is said to be “received by” Venus (the ruler of Taurus). Contemporary astrologers rarely use this term, except in the expression mutual reception (which occurs when two planets are in each other’s sign).

Reception

 

the perception and transformation of mechanical, thermic, electromagnetic, and chemical stimuli into nerve signals. It is effected by perceptive sensory neural structures called receptors. In reception, the primary interaction of the receptor and a stimulus results in receptor potential. Upon reaching a certain critical level, receptor potential induces a rhythmic discharge of impulses in the sensory nerve fiber that branches off the receptor. The magnitude of receptor potential is gradual, that is, it varies with the intensity of stimulation. The reception of stimuli from the external environment is called exteroception, and reception from the organism’s internal environment interoception. Many receptor organs are called sense organs.

reception

[ri′sep·shən]
(communications)
The conversion of modulated electromagnetic waves or electric signals, transmitted through the air or over wires or cables, into the original intelligence, or into desired useful information (as in radar), by means of antennas and electronic equipment.
References in classic literature ?
The like of me go meddling around at the reception of a prophet?
Prince Dolgorouki and a Grand Admiral or two, whom we had seen yesterday at the reception, came on board also.
And who among the company at Monseigneur's reception in that seventeen hundred and eightieth year of our Lord, could possibly doubt, that a system rooted in a frizzled hangman, powdered, gold-laced, pumped, and white-silk stockinged, would see the very stars out!
The ceremony made use of at the reception of a stranger is somewhat unusual; as soon as he enters, all the courtiers strike him with their cudgels till he goes back to the door; the amity then subsisting between us did not secure me from this uncouth reception, which they told me, upon my demanding the reason of it, was to show those whom they treated with that they were the bravest people in the world, and that all other nations ought to bow down before them.
I objected strongly to this proposition, plausible as it was, as the difficulties of the route would be almost insurmountable, unacquainted as we were with the general bearings of the country, and I reminded my companion of the hardships which we had already encountered in our uncertain wanderings; in a word, I said that since we had deemed it advisable to enter the valley, we ought manfully to face the consequences, whatever they might be; the more especially as I was convinced there was no alternative left us but to fall in with the natives at once, and boldly risk the reception they might give us; and that as to myself, I felt the necessity of rest and shelter, and that until I had obtained them, I should be wholly unable to encounter such sufferings as we had lately passed through.
On the following day, therefore, without troubling himself to consult the partners, he landed in Baker's Bay, and proceeded to erect a shed for the reception of the rigging, equipments, and stores of the schooner that was to be built for the use of the settlement.
We will not describe the reception they got from the Royal Geographical Society, nor the intense curiosity and consideration of which they became the objects.
All that troubled him but little; and he gave a warm reception every evening to the wine of the royal vintage of Chaillot, without a suspicion that several flasks of that same wine (somewhat revised and corrected, it is true, by Doctor Coictier), cordially offered to Edward IV.
At the Ambassador's reception I met, for the first time, Mark Twain.
With these words she greeted Prince Vasili Kuragin, a man of high rank and importance, who was the first to arrive at her reception.
He then summoned Bristle and said to him: "Assemble all the nobility in the great reception hall, and also tell Blinkem that I want him immediately.
The girls at Patty's Place were dressing for the reception which the Juniors were giving for the Seniors in February.