recharge area

recharge area

[′rē‚chärj ‚er·ē·ə]
(hydrology)
An area in which water is absorbed that eventually reaches the zone of saturation in one or more aquifers. Also known as intake area.
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Contract notice: Establish and implement monitoring the quality and quantity of groundwater in the recharge area of ?
Its shrinkage also weakens Delhi's war on air pollution, and means reduction in groundwater recharge area -- a severe blow to a city facing sharp depletion of groundwater table.
The GMB's middle groundwater vulnerability risk zones were mainly located in the groundwater recharge area (Figure 10), these vulnerable zones covered around 37% of the studied area.
While the recharge area of the Mountain Aquifer is largely located in the West Bank, Israeli extractions amount to 89 per cent of the water resources, which are subsequently allocated to those residing in Israel and in Israeli settlements.
Years ago, the Jack Daniel's firm took steps to keep the water pure by purchasing hundreds of acres in the recharge area surrounding the spring.
The Paris Moraine and the hydrogeological features of this groundwater recharge area should also be included in the Official Plan, in accordance with the Provincial Policy Statement that refers to protecting, improving and restoring the quality and quantity of water.
In addition, by delineating the recharge area for a spring, potential sources of spring water contamination can be located.
Owners' meeting lounge, landscaped gardens with gazebos, visitor suite, secure parking, sheltered battery-car recharge area, keep-fit suite.
As Lennox, Adams, and Chaplik (1990) argue, "According to the public utility, a technically sound recharge area map and education of both municipal officials and residents are the key elements for convincing a town to adopt a wellhead protection strategy.
If someone is building in a groundwater recharge area, where natural streams flow into drinking water reserves such as the foothills, environmental considerations are a great concern, and have to be protected," says Craig Hinckley, environmental planner with the office of City Building Permits.
It flows out of the Gifford Pinchot National Forest along a 212-square-mile watershed, and it serves as a groundwater recharge area for key aquifers.