recharge basin

recharge basin

[′rē‚chärj ‚bās·ən]
(civil engineering)
A basin constructed in sandy material to collect water, as from storm drains, for the purpose of replenishing groundwater supply.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Tenders are invited for Desilting Cleaning of Sewer Line, Manholes, Recharge basin and Recharge pits at GGSIPU Campus at Sector 16 C Dwarka
Groundwater recharge: During winter and spring runoff, BTF's irrigation system supplies river water to a groundwater recharge basin at the edge of the property.
The Bureau of Reclamation has released for public review the Draft Environmental Assessment for construction of a San Joaquin River Restoration Program groundwater recharge basin within Shafter-Wasco Irrigation District.
The consultants designed an expansion of the water recharge basin system and new conveyance facilities that would include a canal system that can operate in two directions.
In 1981 and 1983, court orders were entered directing CPS Chemical and Madison to prevent the continued spread of the entire contaminant plume by instituting a four-pronged plan, which included installing a slurry cutoff wall and recovery wells, dredging Pricketts Pond--a man-made recharge basin within the watershed--and relocating Pricketts Brook, which flows through the center of the industrial sites.
Construction of a Recharge basin at north fork preserve, town of riverhead.
So instead of discharging that back in to the Gulf, we're looking at taking that water and artificially recharging it through artificially constructed recharge basins, and then into the groundwater system.
This water, in both California and Australia, typically is injected into groundwater or recharge basins for a period of time before it can be extracted and used as a drinking water source, a procedure called indirect potable reuse (IPR).
There are three main components of this project currently under construction: the Advanced Water Purification Facility (AWPF), a 13-mile pipeline connecting the AWPF to OCWD's groundwater recharge basins, and expansion of the existing seawater intrusion barrier with additional injection and monitoring wells.
Most retention ponds develop a sealed bottom that stops infiltration; these can be designed to have porous bottoms to become recharge basins.
The site was never on the list of Superfund sites, but DEC reported that waste water generated during the manufacturing process was treated on-site and then discharged to three on-site recharge basins.