reciprocal

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reciprocal

1. Maths of or relating to a number or quantity divided into one
2. Navigation denoting a course or bearing that is 180? from the previous or assumed one
3. Maths a number or quantity that when multiplied by a given number or quantity gives a product of one

Reciprocal

 

a number whose product with a given number is equal to 1. For example, 5 and 1/5 are mutually reciprocal, as are —2/3 and —3/2. For any number a that is not equal to 0 there exists the reciprocal 1/a.

reciprocal

[ri′sip·rə·kəl]
(mathematics)
The reciprocal of a number A is the number 1/ A.
References in periodicals archive ?
The interpretation of our results led to a context-specific revision to Bandura's (1986) model of triadic reciprocality.
Finally, we categorized the themes under the three factors of triadic reciprocality and examine the interaction among the categorized themes through the lens of social cognitive framework.
The film's effect and meaning depend upon the narrative's reversing the direction of power that Jeff exerts, and thus leads the way to achieving the reciprocality involved in intersubjective relationships.
The following three hypotheses each address the issues of the validity of cognitive theories of empowerment, LH and the reciprocality of empowerment, with each hypothesis referring to a different method used to compare empowered and LH persons.
In Figure 1 the relationship of work roles, capability, and commitment are presented as being interactive, reflecting Bandura's conceptualization of the triadic reciprocality, or reciprocal interactions between factors.
Accordingly, one assumption of this theory, as posited by Bandura (1986), is the idea of triadic reciprocality (See Figure 1).
Bandura's social cognitive theory postulates that "human functioning is explained in terms of a model of triadic reciprocality in which behaviour, cognitive and other personal factors, and environmental events all operate as interacting determinants of each other" (p.
Another country specific factor, not directly linked to small countries, was that often neighbouring countries had political ambitions which prevented reciprocality of entry, or there were other interventionist government measures which shaped the industry structure.
Furthermore, Bandura's (1986, 2001) explanation of human behavior as triadic reciprocality provides a framework for self-efficacy that tends to be stable unless further informed by the consequences of deliberate action.
Bandura termed this concept triadic reciprocality (see Figure 1) and stated that the interactions between the three factors do not have to occur simultaneously or with the same intensity.
This organizing framework extends and redefines the social learning theory concept of interaction based on triadic reciprocality (Bandura, 2004).