recluse


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recluse

a person who lives in solitude to devote himself to prayer and religious meditation; a hermit, anchorite, or anchoress
References in classic literature ?
In Wordsworth's prefatory advertisement to the first edition of The Prelude, published in 1850, it is stated that that work was intended to be introductory to The Recluse: and that The Recluse, if completed, would have consisted of three parts.
It was a rather gloomy dwelling for one who was neither a recluse nor a student, and I think it gave something of its character to me-- perhaps some of its former occupant's character; for always I felt in it a certain melancholy that was not in my natural disposition, nor, I think, due to loneliness.
The city, on its side, had founded in honor of the damoiselle, a public breviary, which had been fastened near the window of the cell, in order that passers-by might halt there from time to time, were it only to pray; that prayer might remind them of alms, and that the poor recluses, heiresses of Madame Rolande's vault, might not die outright of hunger and forgetfulness.
To confine ourselves to the cell in the Tour-Roland, we must say that it had never lacked recluses.
This business of setting up a petty shop is almost the only resource of women, in circumstances at all similar to those of our unfortunate recluse.
The recluse thinks of men as having his manner, or as not having his manner; and as having degrees of it, more and less.
A recluse sees only two or three persons, and allows them all their room; they spread themselves at large.
Except at such times as he saw Ruth, or dropped in to see his sister Gertude, he lived a recluse, in each day accomplishing at least three days' labor of ordinary men.
He gave little to life, asked little of life, and, in the show business, was a recluse in the very heart of life.
I had lived a placid, uneventful, sedentary existence all my days--the life of a scholar and a recluse on an assured and comfortable income.
It was founded many ages ago by a holy recluse who lived at first in a cave in the rock--a cave which is inclosed in the convent walls, now, and was reverently shown to us by the priests.
Occasionally the air breathed through the crevices of the hut, and the low flame that fluttered about the embers of the fire threw their wavering light on the person of the sullen recluse.