Reconversion


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Reconversion

 

in a postwar economy, the switch to the production of civilian output. Reconversion implies structural shifts in production, capital investments, and foreign trade turnover and, in most cases, the implementation of a monetary reform and a change in the legal regulation of the economy. The restoration and reconversion of the economy are concurrent processes. During reconversion there is a temporary decline in the absolute level of production.

In the capitalist countries reconversion is carried out spontaneously, in the context of an acute competitive struggle. Moreover, it is accompanied by rising unemployment associated with the decline in military orders. The monopolies maintain high prices for consumer goods, making it possible to pass on to the working people the expenditures associated with reconversion. After World War II (1939–45) the reconversion and restoration of the economies of Western Europe were accomplished primarily under the Marshall Plan, which led to the intensified export of American capital and the strengthening of US political influence. In the capitalist countries reconversion of the economy, which proved to be partial, was accompanied by militarization.

In the USSR and the other socialist countries the transition to a peacetime economy was made in conformity with a plan and, despite the colossal scale of wartime devastation, with minimal losses to the economy and in the shortest possible time.

A. A. KHANDRUEV

References in periodicals archive ?
For taxpayers converting a substantial account, there are sophisticated conversion, recharacterization, and reconversion options related to establishing multiple Roth IRA accounts and investing each account in a separate asset class.
provide the uranium reconversion service for the power utility.
In that ruling, the taxpayer represented that neither the owners nor the taxpayer itself had taken or would take any material position inconsistent with the position that would have existed had the conversion not occurred; thus the reconversion caused the legal and financial arrangements between the taxpayer and its owners to be identical in all material respects.
Les auteurs cherchent a << reperer les dynamiques, mecanismes et dispositifs qui amenent les collectivites a se reconvertir et a mettre en place des trajectoires innovantes de reconversion >> (p.
La reconversion economique vers les nouvelles technologies n'a pas pu etre suivie par toutes les villes.
The large amounts of land affected by the deforestation and reconversion processes reflect this.
We are identifying suitable properties above retail operations in city centres for reconversion to flats.
Repentance, in turn, Martos points out, was no longer seen primarily as a reconversion or change of heart, but as a penalty imposed for violating the law.
However, any reconversions that a taxpayer has made before November 1, 1998 will not be treated as excess reconversions and will not be taken into account in determining whether any later reconversion is an excess reconversion.
Webbe, a recusant who had been accused by John Gee "'of inueigl[ing] disciples'" under the guise of promoting "'a new gayne way to learne Languages'" (134), seems a fascinating Caroline connection to pursue, given Jonson's apparent reconversion to Catholicism in his last decade, and the congruence between Webbe's humanist beliefs and Jonson's stances in his Discoveries.
Father Edward Jackman, who left the United Church of Canada in the mid-sixties to become a Dominican, has had what he calls "a reconversion to Protestantism.
I sketched his important role in the labor movement of the 1920s and 1930s when, before the rise of the CIO, militant industrial unionism had been labeled "Musteism," his brief career as a Trotskyist, his reconversion to Christian pacifism, and his subsequent work for the Fellowship of Reconciliation, where he helped found the Congress of Racial Equality.