rectangular pulse

rectangular pulse

[rek′taŋ·gyə·lər ′pəls]
(electronics)
A pulse in which the wave amplitude suddenly changes from zero to another value at which it remains constant for a short period of time, and then suddenly changes back to zero.
References in periodicals archive ?
Where [DELTA] defines the shift of rectangular pulse center from the start of revolution.
Dyakonov, "Nanosecond rectangular pulse generators using avalanche and MIS transistors", Instrum.
The Bartlett-Lewis process and Neyman-Scott process are two cell group point processes described by Rodriguez-Iturbe (1987) that gave rise to the Bartlett-Lewis rectangular pulse model and the Neyman-Scott rectangular pulse model.
The signal from the generator of harmonic signals 8 or nonharmonic signal generator 12, through commutator K is transferred to the rectangular pulse forming scheme 11.
Pulse-width modulation utilizes a rectangular pulse wave that essentially turns the LEDs on and off for imperceptibly short periods of time, maximizing energy efficiency and power savings.
The pulse signal, produced by the photodiode, goes into the control electronic block which produces a rectangular pulse of voltage with the regulated duration in the scale from 1.
The first null of the rectangular pulse occurs at 1/[T.
In an ideal world, it would be a variable-frequency rectangular pulse train of constant amplitude, which wouldn't be difficult to generate with a reasonably flexible digital I/O card with timing-sequencing features.
The tail can be stationary or jittery, with the tail moving up and down the falling edge of the ideal rectangular pulse.
Most common type excitation signal is a rectangular pulse or step [12], [13].