recuperability

recuperability

[rē‚küp·rə′bil·əd·ē]
(communications)
Ability to continue to operate after a partial or complete loss of the primary communications facility resulting from sabotage, enemy attack, or other disaster.
References in periodicals archive ?
The first, the CARVER + Shock method, was created by the FDA to score and rank your operations based on seven attributes --criticality, accessibility, recuperability, vulnerability, effect, recognizability and shock--to ultimately determine your greatest overall risk and vulnerability.
Which analytical technique (PMESII-PT (political, military, economic, social, infrastructure, information, physical environment, and time) for the OE, ASCOPE (area, structures, capabilities, organizations, people, and events) for civil considerations, CARVER (criticality, accessibility, recuperability, vulnerability, effect, and recognizability) or CARVERSHP (adding symbolism, historical significance, and political significance) for targeting analysis, or other techniques or combination of techniques) does the commander want to see used and how must the analysis be presented?
carefully corn figured stanzaic forms) suggests the recuperability of
The desires that it mobilized remain those of a certain crowd: mostly white, mostly New York based or exhibited by New York galleries, and with mostly liberal politics born from a deep faith in the recuperability of the public sphere.
Augustinegrass Stolons Fair Tall fescue Tillers Good Zoysia Stolons and Excellent rhizomes NAME RECUPERABILITY Bermudagrass Excellent Bluegrass Good Buffalograss Slow Creeping Very good bentgrass Fine fescue Poor to fair Perennial Poor to fair ryegrass St.
Recuperability -- How well could a system recover from an attack?
Department of Defense, the method breaks a target into segments and considers, per the acronym, its criticality, accessibility, recuperability, vulnerability, effect of loss, and recognizability, to assess the "shock" effect of an attack.
Influenced, even as he critiques them, by Chicano/a nationalist writings on the dreamed and desired recuperability of an Atzlan home within the territory of the southwest United States, De Genova insists on making Mexican Chicago his subject, following his informants in largely eschewing "Mexican American" as a term and seeing the Mexican character not just of enclaves but of the whole city.
CARVER stands for criticality, accessibility, recuperability, vulnerability, effect and recognizability (See Field Manual 34-36 Special Operation Forces Intelligence and Electronics Warfare Operation, Sept.
That field has in recent years become synonymous with the work of Jeffrey Masten--an ironic accolade, given his deconstruction of individual "hands"--and Hirschfeld devotes space in the first of two introductory chapters to asserting both the value and the recuperability of the cultural information that gets lost in his model.
285) to experience its multiple challenge to easy recuperability.