recusant

(redirected from recusancy)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Wikipedia.

recusant

1. (in 16th to 18th century England) a Roman Catholic who did not attend the services of the Church of England, as was required by law
2. (formerly, of Catholics) refusing to attend services of the Church of England
References in periodicals archive ?
Conceding that Shakespeare was never officially cited for recusancy (unlike his daughter, Susannah), Taylor argues that he may have retained his commitment to traditional faith nonetheless, since his dual residence in Stratford and London might have enabled him to avoid obligatory church attendance in both places (296-97).
In the Jacobean period Sir Francis Smith kept up sufficient church attendance to avoid charges of recusancy, though his mother Anne Smith (nee Giffard) had made sure that all her children were brought up in the Roman faith.
Beauregard, Shakespeare and the Culture of Christianity in Early Modern England (New York: Fordham University Press, 2003), especially Richard Dutton's discussion of The Comedy of Errors, Lucian's essay "On Slander" and Elizabethan religious doctrine (26-43) and John Freeman's study of Hamlefs Ghost in light of the history of Elizabethan recusancy (222-59).
John Mush's "True Report" of the life and death of Margaret Clitherow, the young, probably pregnant wife and mother who was pressed to death in York in 1586 for refusing to plead to a charge of harboring priests (presumed in law to be traitors) is analyzed in detail to bring out the parallels to Bale's account of the trial and burning of the Protestant Anne Askew; it is held to be a didactic and devotional narrative presenting and advocating recusancy as a form of martyrdom as well as inculcating reverence for the priesthood.
4) Charles's first parliament declined to make any realistic contribution to the impending war, refusing to improve upon its initial offer of two subsidies as a "free gift," while the Commons proved alarmingly willing to be distracted by domestic issues such as the plague, recusancy, Arminianism, and Buckingham's shortcomings.
And to check the enemy within the gates they demanded that the recusancy laws be strictly enforced, and that "our most noble Prince [Charles] may be timely and happily married to one of our own religion.
For historians of recusancy, these emphases are no less revealing than the rhetorical slant of a literary tract, if only we take the trouble to analyze them.
To such a creature, wouldn't the one unifying trait of our criticism (the one linking analyses of Homer to deconstructions of Calvin Klein ads, studies of the theme of Christian recusancy in medieval Icelandic sagas to critiques of subway performance artists) be its elaborate defensiveness?
8) This will, now in the Lancashire County Records Office in Preston, recommended that the actor Fulk Gillom and William Shakeshafte be taken into the service of Sir Thomas Hesketh or some other good master, and it places the "lost," "undocumented," "mysterious" years of Shakesepeare's young adulthood at the heart of a network of seigneurial recusancy, connected at once with the Catholic hinterland of Lancashire, and with an international Counter-Reformation Catholicism and the Jesuit missions of Campion and Parsons.
Popish She-Wolves": Noblewomen, Recusancy, and Resistance in Early Modern England, Colleen M.
In the milieu leading up to and following the Armada's defeat, Protestants sought to define English recusancy as an ontological impediment to English military victory.
60) Two recusancy acts passed in 1593 hint at the links between the two, and highlight a key difference.