recusant

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recusant

1. (in 16th to 18th century England) a Roman Catholic who did not attend the services of the Church of England, as was required by law
2. (formerly, of Catholics) refusing to attend services of the Church of England
References in periodicals archive ?
The fact that The Woman Hater comments on the Plot has been noted for over a century: in his 1914 study of Beaumont, Charles Mills Gayley drew attention to the Vaux connection and commented that the dramatist 'alludes with horror to the Plot itself, but holds up for ridicule the informers who swarmed the streets of London in the years succeeding, and trumped up charges of conspiracy and recusancy against unoffending persons'.
She then turns to Satire 4 and its anxiety about recusancy to argue, "Donne's handling of the potentially treasonous material of his poem is neatly equivalent to his handling of the equally dangerous pose of his portrait.
T]here was a real risk in obstinate persistence in recusancy.
The attack on Cecil may also be seen as a criticism of the policies that he pursued, such as the ruthless recusancy laws established at the Hampton Court Conference in 1604 or the negotiations that brought peace with Spain that same year.
Second, Ackroyd interprets John Shakespeare's sudden absence from the Stratford Council, where he had been a regular and leading member up to 1577, to his recusancy, that is, his determination to absent himself from required church attendance out of conviction that the reformed liturgy was heretical (67-68).
It is possible to suspect that she was Anthony's mother and that the process was in respect of recusancy.
1) This suggests a special community, defined by its recusancy, with its own covert systems of distribution and particular needs for support.
77 In view of Byrd's Catholicism, it is interesting to note that Sir George Heneage, of Towes (a hamlet of Ludford Magna, in Lincolnshire), was convicted of recusancy on 25 July 1616, and that his lands were seized on 20 October 1626 (Calendar of State Papers, Domestic Series, of the Reign of Charles I, 1645-1647, London, 1891, p.
Second, Byrd's recusancy is well known, but his Catholic connections went far beyond mere absence from church: as Harley notes, `Byrd was keeping dangerous company in the mid-1580s' (p.
123) In such cases the church courts usually permitted the debtor to receive the sacrament privately, recognizing that the sacrament had a legal as well as a religious function in releasing the communicant from the penalties of recusancy.