red giant star


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.
Related to red giant star: red dwarf star, Stellar evolution, Life cycle of a star

red giant star

[′red ¦ji·ənt ′stär]
(astronomy)
A star whose evolution has progressed to the point where hydrogen core burning has been completed, the helium core has become denser and hotter than originally, and the envelope has expanded to perhaps 100 times its initial size.
References in periodicals archive ?
As new stars are born in a binary system they grow to become red giant stars, like the Sun, after the hydrogen needed for nuclear fusion runs out, notes the release.
Kawaler contributed as part of the research team that studied regular changes in the brightness of the host star, Kepler-56, an aging red giant star with two planets in close orbits and a massive third planet in a distant orbit.
For example, if the red giant star that likely gave rise to the pulsar suddenly shed more than half its mass to form the new pulsar, the planet could not remain bound.
Many stars are born in binary systems so an expanding red giant star will sometimes collide with an orbiting companion star.
Washington, October 14 ( ANI ): An international team of astronomers have discovered an intriguing spiral structure surrounding a pulsing red giant star, which they believe may offer a preview of how the sun will behave at the end of its life.
16 NATURE suggests the presence of a red giant star accompanied by a compact white dwarf star.
A common kind of sandpaper grit -- silicon carbide -- also serves as the primary kind of carbon particle that forms in the average red giant star, according to a group of scientists.
But unlike other X-ray pulsars, GX1+4 has a red giant star as a partner, and a red giant produces a slow, weak stellar wind unlikely to alter the ring's motion.
Anders hypothesizes that the diamondswere probably created billions of years ago during the dying years of a red giant star.
In other words, the orbit of 4U1820-30 was once inside a red giant star.
Our Sun, for example, is expected to swell so that it nearly reaches or possibly engulfs Earth, as it becomes a red giant star.
However, new results have overturned this longstanding concept by detecting abundant hot water vapour in the atmosphere of a very carbon-rich red giant star.