red ocher


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Related to red ocher: yellow ocher

red ocher

[′red ′ō·kər]
(inorganic chemistry)
(mineralogy)

red ocher

A mixture of hematites; any of a number of natural earths used as red pigments.
References in periodicals archive ?
raddle (also called ruddle, red ocher or bole: a moderate reddish brown)
In 2001, Henshilwood found a 70,000-year-old polished red ocher mudstone with a geometric design (simple crosshatchings framed by two parallel lines with a third line down the middle) carved into the surface, the oldest known example of a complex design produced by a human.
With X-ray diffraction and a scanning electron microscope, the pigment was identified as red ocher consisting of a number of iron oxides including hematite.
The yellow ocher and red ocher of the buildings fits very well and the land even tolerates castles on the hilltops.
Each toolkit consisted of several stone tools, some stained with red ocher, lying above and below an abalone shell partly coated with a red mixture.
Digging deeper at the base of the stone monolith, the archeologists made what may be an even more stunning discovery: red ocher and stone artifacts of an age that could triple the time people have occupied Australia, from about 60,000 years to 116,000 years and perhaps as much as 176,000 years.
One of the graves, at Russia's 24,000-year-old Sunghir site, contains a boy and a girl buried head to head, dusted in red ocher, and ornamented with thousands of ivory beads, fox-teeth pendants, and pierced antlers.
A simpler explanation for ancient humans' use of red ocher might be cosmetics, much as in modern mortuary practice ("Stone Age Code Red: Scarlet symbols emerge in Israeli Cave," SN: 11/1/03, p.
Investigators now say that red ocher found in Qafzeh Cave's oldest sections supports the controversial theory that symbolic thinking, a hallmark of modern-day human thought, arose deep in the Stone Age.