red tide


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red tide:

see Dinoflagellatadinoflagellata
, phylum (division) of unicellular, mostly marine algae, called dinoflagellates. In some classification systems this division is called Pyrrhophyta. There are approximately 2,000 species of dinoflagellates.
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red tide

[′red ′tīd]
(biology)
A reddish discoloration of coastal surface waters due to concentrations of certain toxin-producing dinoflagellates. Also known as red water.
References in periodicals archive ?
United States based National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (Noaa), a global authority on marine biology, said that red tide or "harmful algal blooms, HABs, occur when colonies of algae-simple plants that live in the sea and freshwater-grow out of control while producing toxic or harmful effects on people, fish, shellfish, marine mammals, and birds.
To help alleviate the human, environmental and economic effects of red tide
Red tide is caused by the comprehensive action of multiple factors, such as the sudden proliferation and accumulation of some plankton [8].
She sprang into action when manatees paralyzed by the red tide started arriving.
Red tide is a common name for a phenomenon known as an algal bloom (large concentrations of aquatic microorganisms) when it is caused by a few species of dinoflagellates and the bloom takes on a red or brown color.
The SOA notice said that the red tide was caused by a bloom of Noctiluca scintillan, a species of algae.
To the investigators' surprise, three-compounds actually mitigated the classical red tide toxicities.
Some scientists think red tides could become more common due to the warming of Gulf seawater, which is occurring faster than anywhere else in the world, probably accelerated by pollution.
The phenomenon known as a red tide is actually the result of an algal bloom, an event in which marine or fresh water algae accumulate rapidly in the water.
Red tide is a scourge that has affected humans throughout the ages.
A red tide attack has left 60 per cent of buildings in Ajman without regular water supply for days, forcing residents to use bottled water for washing and bathing, residents and officials said.
A majority of anglers ascribed the decreased catches to the after-effects of the red tide that hit the shores of the sultanate in January.