Reduviidae

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Related to reduviid: Romana's sign, triatomine

Reduviidae

[‚rej·ə′vī·ə‚dē]
(invertebrate zoology)
The single family of the hemipteran group Reduvioidea; nearly all have a stridulatory furrow on the prosternum, ocelli are generally present, and the beak is three-segmented.

Reduviidae

 

(assassin bugs), a family of insects of the order Hemiptera. The large and, less commonly, small insects have a short, thick proboscis. Despite their relatively long legs, assassin bugs move slowly. There are about 3,000 species, distributed in Europe, Africa, and North America. The USSR has about 90 species. The insects live in trees and shrubs, in the grass, on the ground, under rocks, and in the burrows of various mammals and birds. They also are found in houses and other man-made structures. Assassin bugs feed on various insects, killing them with a prick of the proboscis and then sucking the blood and soft tissues. Common inhabitants of human dwellings and other man-made structures are Ploearia domestica, which resembles a spider, and Reduvins personatus, a dark brown insect 16–19 mm long. These two insects prey upon flies and other household pests.

REFERENCE

Zhizn’ zhivotnykh, vol. 3. Moscow, 1969.
References in periodicals archive ?
ETYMOLOGY: From the Greek "pronos," protuberance, and the reduviid generic name Zelus, to indicate the great lateral humeral expansions and its relatedness to Zelus.
japonicum fresh water The parasite penetrates intact skin Water snails are intermediate hosts Trypanosomiasis American American: Reduviid T.
The term xenodiagnosis (XD) (7) was introduced in 1914 for the method of detecting trypanosomes in mammal hosts by feeding laboratory bred Reduviid bugs on the animal.
leishmania form" (instead of promastigote and amastigote) and referring to reduviid vectors (Chagas disease) as "bed bugs".
Zelus renardii (Kolenati, 1856), a New World reduviid discovered in Europe (Hemiptera: Reduviidae: Harpactorinae).
During the past several years, a small reduviid (Hemiptera: Heteroptera) belonging to the subfamily Emesinae was occasionally taken in light trap collections from the Florida Keys.