reference

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reference

Philosophy
a. the relation between a word, phrase, or symbol and the object or idea to which it refers
b. the object referred to by an expression

reference

References in periodicals archive ?
In each interview, each serviceman or woman's referentially verifiable historical information, what Mas'ud Zavarzadeh called 'factoids--fact-like details of empirical reality which help create a fictional likeness of the real world' (60), is given to the reader.
The Offence Act culminates in section 133, which referentially incorporates the provisions of the Criminal Code.
He reproduces unusually bad or referentially impossible photographs alongside stories that delve into the disjunction between photographic truth or evidence and any photographic link to reality.
Quine does not countenance even to exclude the alternative, that identity is instead intensional or referentially opaque.
Grid-Tools' award-winning Datamaker[TM] suite ensures that the data held on various interconnected databases is not only masked but referentially intact.
Measures 62-80 are much more referentially overt, as here Riley very closely imitates the melodic and harmonic progressions from the interlude and back into the chorus of "I am the Walrus" (compare to the original song starting front die lyrics "Sitting in an English garden.
Using a schematic plan of Melnikov's 1927 house and studio configured as a Venn diagram, Diao overlays a text meaning "hobbled" or "suppressed" in Russian, allowing the content to be determined both referentially and linguistically.
For case marking, it has been hypothesized that referentially high-ranking agents and low-ranking patients have higher chances of being zero-marked (Comrie 1989).
At one point, he argues that Flaubert's style is elliptical in seeming to intend something beyond what it tells us referentially.
In this study, the data demonstrates how the participants talk about their fathering identities referentially.
The musical idiom is eclectic and draws freely and referentially on recognizable musical styles and stereotypes.
Though referentially proximate to the tutor, this audience footing is not aligned with the person of the tutor, but with the tutor's self-assigned role as a reader.