reflexive

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reflexive

1. Physiol of or relating to a reflex
2. Logic Maths (of a relation) holding between any member of its domain and itself

reflexive

(theory)
A relation R is reflexive if, for all x, x R x.

Equivalence relations, pre-orders, partial orders and total orders are all reflexive.
References in periodicals archive ?
On impersonal reflexives in Romance and Slavic and semantic variation.
To formalize the opposition between the reflexive passive and the impersonal reflexive, he distinguishes between argument se and nonargument se.
7) English LDA reflexives of the type in 4a must be extracted.
Notably, just as topicalization fails to rescue the inanimate reflexive case 4b, so do the other constructions capable of extracting reflexives:
As is to be expected, most previous research has been carried out within the framework of Generative Grammar and deals with either reflexive or logophoric uses of self-forms.
These questions concern: (i) the use types of intensifiers observed in the data of both languages under consideration (adnominal, inclusive, exclusive), (ii) the relationship between intensifiers (self, selbst/selber) and other agent-sensitive expressions (by -self, allein), (iii) relevant developments observed in the data of individual children, (iv) the relationship between intensifying and reflexive self-forms in the English data, and (v) the use of non-bound bare self-forms in an argument position (it will hurt yourself).
Our typological survey is based on data that has been collected during a six-year research project on SELF-intensifiers and reflexives, on the basis of both native speaker consultation (field work and questionnaires) and grammatical descriptions.
The 1st and 2nd person data presented here show a close-to-complete breakdown in the complementarity relation between reflexives and pronominals (encoded in conditions A and B of the BT), and in light of that, one might be tempted to conclude that 1st and 2nd person data are not representative of core binding relations, and that 3rd person data alone embody genuine reflexivity.
For each pronoun, two inflected verbs are provided: a reflexive verb and a nonreflexive verb.
As Haiman's examples show, the terms "light" and "heavy" do not denote a fixed phonological weight which is constant across languages (clearly, the null-form light reflexives in English and Hua are phonologically lighter than the verbal affix light reflexives in Turkish and Russian) but simply that such languages employ a pair of reflexives with contrasting phonological weights.
The first is a difference concerning the distribution of reflexive pronouns.
At first glance, this argumentation appears cogent, as do most of the arguments in those analyses where many niphals are assigned reflexive voice signification.