regulation

(redirected from regulative)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial.
Related to regulative: regulative development

regulation

1. a governmental or ministerial order having the force of law
2. Embryol the ability of an animal embryo to develop normally after its structure has been altered or damaged in some way
3. Electrical engineering the change in voltage occurring when a load is connected across a power supply, caused by internal resistance (for direct current) or internal impedance (alternating current)

regulation

[‚reg·yə′lā·shən]
(control systems)
The process of holding constant a quantity such as speed, temperature, voltage, or position by means of an electronic or other system that automatically corrects errors by feeding back into the system the condition being regulated; regulation thus is based on feedback, whereas control is not.
(electricity)
The change in output voltage that occurs between no load and full load in a transformer, generator, or other source.
(electronics)
The difference between the maximum and minimum tube voltage drops within a specified range of anode current in a gas tube.

regulation

Any rule prescribing permitted or forbidden conduct, whether established by legislation or the action of an administrative agency; also see building code.
References in periodicals archive ?
Table 2--Institutional influence on the development of a smart city and its adoption and acceptance by the targeted end users Institutions Development of infrastructure and physical facilities Regulative Gale complained about the alleged red tape of the Korean government bureaucracy.
When large regulative distances exist, the FIEs whose home countries' regulatory systems are more fully developed and properly functioning than that of the host market are likely to conceive the local regulatory environment as less supportive and less conducive to their business.
Formal institutions, a component of the regulative mechanism in the institutional environment, have an impact on MNEs' entry mode choice.
The regulative structure refers to systems of rules as a governance system--the "rules of a game" (Scott, 2006, p133).
What is quite ingenious about the construction of Farmer's argument is that the invocation of the Golden Rule in conjunction with the elevation of the regulative ideal of love permits him to implicitly respond to common criticisms of this kind of ethical practice or injunction, criticisms that hinge on the limitations imposed upon particular individuals by their concrete circumstances.
They are based on salutogenic and regulative effects and not on pathogenic mechanisms.
Regulative legitimacy refers to the conformance of the action to established rules, policies, and procedures (i.
When curing disease is the only regulative value, as it has been, every step enables the next, with harvesting tissues and organs from late-stage chimeric fetuses and newborns (where the most useful stem cells may be found) the logical consequence.
Although for much of the paper I shall proceed as if Aristotle accepted PP in the same way that he accepted any number of other philosophical theses that occur explicitly in his works, several reasons suggest that it is more plausible to view PP as something of an unarticulated regulative principle that guided Aristotle rather than an explicitly formulated principle that he accepted.
There may be some continued consciousness of what Frank Lentricchia has described as the "imposing and repressive father-figure" of the New Criticism and its gestures of close reading (xiii), but that regulative and identificatory disciplinary practice has been largely abandoned in classrooms and in academic analysis.
Some researchers classify the field as social regulative policy that differs from all four types of Theodore Lowi's classification (Lowi 1972: 300).
Treasury departments have a mix of systems: automated, partly automated and manual processes, all charged with completing a task while complying with corporate governance and regulative reporting.