regulator


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regulator

1. any of various mechanisms or devices, such as a governor valve, for controlling fluid flow, pressure, temperature, voltage, etc.
2. a gene the product of which controls the synthesis of a product from another gene

regulator

[′reg·yə‚lād·ər]
(control systems)
A device that maintains a desired quantity at a predetermined value or varies it according to a predetermined plan.
(mining engineering)
An opening in a wall or door in the return airway of a district to increase its resistance and reduce the volume of air flowing.

regulator

In a gas supply system, a device for controlling and maintaining a uniform gas supply pressure.
References in periodicals archive ?
The industrial gas regulators is one where technologies, applications, and industries are constantly changing owing to which exports-imports tend to change as well.
The bank's chairman, Pratip Chaudhuri, said that a single regulator would help remove the regulatory arbitrage currently existing between banks and housing finance companies.
The work by Boyer's group "identifies a cohort of genes" that are targets of these master regulators, comments Ian Chambers of the University of Edinburgh.
Attach the ground strap, NSN 6150-00-999-2100, to the regulator with lock washer, NSN 5310-00-550-1130, and nut, NSN 5310-00-761-6882.
A small, independent and technology-focused regulator of the kind that has proved so successful in the UK and Asian countries such as Hong Kong, Singapore and Malaysia would be ideally suited to achieving Japan's most ambitious national goals in the telecommunications area.
Typical discrete solutions utilize various on-board regulators for LAN/GbE, VCC-VID, PCI slots, Universal Serial Bus, keyboard, and mouse consisting of voltage references, resistors, capacitors, op amps, diodes, bipolar and MOS transistors.
Should a regulator seek to stop a business combination, he must, outside of certain highly regulated industries, sue in a court of law to show that the merger violates the law (usually the Sherman Act).
Regulators expect banks to retain knowledgeable and well-trained auditors.
For example, Wisconsin SAGE benefits providers and regulators alike by holding monthly meetings, seminars, and evaluation tours of new or renovated facilities that include a detailed assessment by a team comprised of a regulator, provider, designer, nurse, researcher, and advocate.
The FEN, meanwhile, is fed a time history of regulator outputs and furnace state conditions, which enables it to learn to predict the furnace's future state.
Regulators usually try to keep the insurance industry boring and dull.

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