reify

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reify

To regard (something abstract) as a material thing.
References in periodicals archive ?
This essay argues that Edward Said's work was deeply shaped by Georg Lukacs's theory of reification and totality, as set out in History and Class Consciousness, and also molded by a reinflection of Lukacs's thinking through the work of Antonio Gramsci.
As such, it is interesting to examine the work of Csaba Varga, which addresses reification in law, as well as the more recent works of philosopher Axel Honneth, to verify whether reification can be relevant to the study of the insurance contract.
As these narratives build up I wonder about them as reifications, as projections of "selves" with an independent existence when what I feel is the potential of the website is to show a dependent existence, the need for belonging that students are faced with when coming to university.
The creation of new reifications challenges the existence of prior ones.
A disadvantage is that the process may be more time consuming than individual study of reifications of the concept.
I felt that the construction of a uniform 'Maluku' by Dutch Malukans from a distinctly central Malukan perspective and their highly modern reification of 'traditional' phenomena like 'soa' (clan groups), 'sasi' (resource regulation), or 'pela' (village associations) needs more critical attention.
Boughey offers a theory of reproduction based on people's reification of events.
I think Dewey would say that public choice theory, two generations after he wrote these words, is still clinging to reifications; and I think he would say that these reifications also tend toward bad consequences.
Sometimes," the chapter concludes, "this passion, this fetishism, made it difficult to distinguish, among post-modernist artists and poststructuralist critics alike, between critics of the reifications and fragmentation of the sign and connoisseurs of this same process.
If the macro form of the inscription of power relations in language is the master discourse of theory and science, with its exclusions and reifications of "otherness," the micro form is the more widespread and insidious profusion of racial stereotypes, innuendoes, and epithets.
In Marxism and the Philosophy of Language, Volosinov/Bakhtin alludes to the danger of the process of reification and appropriation of subversive utterances which "inevitably [lose] force, denigrating into allegory and becoming the object not of live social intelligibility but of philological comprehension" (Volosinov 22).
He seems to imply that we do not have an adequate concept of language--that as it now stands, "language" is another reification.