related

(redirected from relatedness)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Wikipedia.

related

(in diatonic music) denoting or relating to a key that has notes in common with another key or keys
References in periodicals archive ?
It does so by showing that experience dealing with political risk represents a key resource for MNEs which plays a determining role in corporate product diversification strategy by encouraging a greater degree of product relatedness.
The BPNS assesses levels of competence, autonomy, and relatedness as designed by Edward Deci and Richard Ryan's CET.
Results reveal that cultured geoducks exhibit decreased genetic diversity as evidenced by reduced AR, increased relatedness, and reduced [N.
H1a-relatedness: The use of game dynamics will increase relatedness in the course.
Finally, positive relatedness is one of the other key and significant aspects in wellbeing and it is the ability to establish close and intimate relationship with others, enthusiasm to establish such relationship and also sharing love with others.
Further complicating the picture, several factors might alter the influence of firm relatedness on stock market reactions to joint venture announcements.
Correspondingly, the cultural orientation of this cultural group can be summarized as individual psychological autonomy and individual psychological relatedness (Keller, 2011).
The two other cornerstones of the self-determination theory, perceived autonomy and perceived social relatedness, are neglected or included in task and ego involving climate sub-dimensions (see Perceived Motivational Climate in Sports Questionnaire-2; Walling et al.
T]eachers need to recognize the potential social consequences of participation in certain activities, and possibly provide an environment conducive to the establishment of rewarding peer relationships, thereby facilitating feelings of relatedness.
Finally relatedness is the need to feel connected to and accepted by others in a social milieu.
Relatedness coefficients range from 1 for genetically identical individuals to 0 for unrelated individuals, although negative values can occur when individuals are less related than random individuals (Hardy and Vekemans, 2002).