Renal Colic


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Renal Colic

 

acute griping pains, or colic, in the lumbar or iliac region caused by spasms of the smooth muscles or calices of the renal pelvis or by spasms of the smooth muscles of the ureter following a sudden obstruction to the flow of urine. Renal colic usually occurs when the urinary tract is obstructed by a stone or an accumulation of urinary salts. During an attack of renal colic the patient experiences great discomfort, continually shifts his body, and urinates frequently and painfully. Nausea and vomiting are common. The clinical picture sometimes resembles that of acute abdomen. Treatment consists of local application of heat, warm baths, and administration of pain relievers and antispasmodics.

References in periodicals archive ?
Does the protocol for suspected renal colic lead to unnecessary radiation exposure of young female patients?
Prevalence and clinical importance of alternative causes of symptoms using a renal colic computed tomography protocol in patients with flank or back pain and absence of pyuria.
The analysis maybe performed in a very short time and has a high sensitivity for distinguishing stones and other causes of renal colic (7).
After approval by our institutional research ethics board, we performed a retrospective cohort study of consecutive patients who presented to the ED of a Canadian tertiary hospital with renal colic between 2011 and 2013.
Methods: The cross-sectional study was conducted at Ankara AtatA1/4rk Training and Research Hospital, Turkey, from June 2012 to December 2012 and comprised patients with complaints suggesting of renal colic and diagnosed with urinary stone.
renal colic, spinal-cord injury, acute cauda equina syndrome) that result in acute LBP.
The value of C-reactive protein determination in patients with renal colic to decide to decide urgent urinary diversion.
Renal colic is the most common nonobstetrical emergency in pregnancy
Severe renal colic mandating a visit to the emergency department and admission for control of pain occurred in 2% (4/192) and 6% (2/33) of patients treated for renal stones and ureteric stones, respectively.
Other differential diagnosis like perforated viscus, especially peptic ulcer, acute cholecystitis and biliary colic, acute intestinal obstruction, mesenteric vascular occlusion, renal colic and dissecting aortic aneurysm were ruled out as the abdominal pain of patient was non-coliky, and imaging modalities like USG and CT scan ruled out these possibilities providing no evidence of gall-bladder wall inflammation, multiple air fluid levels in abdomen, renal stone or any aneurysmal growth over aorta.
We present a 34-year-old male with a history of Friedreich's ataxia who attended our clinic complaining of left renal colic and dysuria.
1) Renal and skeletal symptoms are often more evident with parathyroid carcinoma, with patient complaints related to polyuria, renal colic, and nephrolithiasis.