sinus

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sinus,

cavity or hollow space in the body, usually filled with air or blood. In humans the paranasal sinuses, mucus-lined cavities in the bones of the face, are connected by passageways to the nose and probably help to warm and moisten inhaled air. When drainage from them is blocked, as after a cold, these sinuses often become infected, a condition called sinusitis. The accumulation of pus results in pressure, headaches, pain, and general discomfort. In invertebrates one of the spaces among the muscles and viscera through which blood returns to the heart is also known as a sinus.

sinus

(sÿ -nŭs) A semienclosed break along the borders of a lunar mare or in a scarp. The word is used in the approved name of such a feature on the Moon. (Latin: bay)

Sinus

 

in anatomy, a cavity, protrusion, or long closed channel. In vertebrates (including man), the term “sinus” refers to a channel filled with venous blood in the dura mater. The cavity in some cranial bones is also called a sinus. [23–1297–]

sinus

[′sī·nəs]
(biology)
A cavity, recess, or depression in an organ, tissue, or other part of an animal body.

sinus

1. Anatomy
a. any bodily cavity or hollow space
b. a large channel for venous blood, esp between the brain and the skull
c. any of the air cavities in the cranial bones
2. Pathol a passage leading to a cavity containing pus
3. Botany a small rounded notch between two lobes of a leaf, petal, etc.
4. an irregularly shaped cavity
References in periodicals archive ?
12,13) Although rare, tumor herniation into the pelvicalyceal system and renal sinus is characteristic and may result in hydronephrosis and hemorrhage.
21-23) Interestingly, in our series, patients with distant metastases also had a high rate of renal sinus and/or vein involvement: 68%, 92%, and 79% in groups Nx, N0, and N1, respectively.
Patient underwent surgery and nephrostomy showed a large oblong mass in relation to renal sinus of left kidney.
As rightly pointed out by Aron and colleagues, the lipomatous areas of the AML component may be mistaken for perinephric fat or renal sinus fat invasion in a classical RCC, resulting in upstaging of the tumour.
The patient underwent a radical nephrectomy, which confirmed the diagnosis of high-grade urothelial carcinoma of the upper urinary tract involving the renal pelvis and extending into the renal sinus fat, renal parenchyma, and into perinephric adipose tissue (pT4).
CT findings of HIV nephropathy include decreased corticomedullary differentiation, decreased renal sinus fat, and parenchymal heterogeneity.
Signs of biologic aggressiveness should also be absent, such as renal sinus invasion, vascular invasion, tumor necrosis, and high nuclear grade.
3) The diagnosis is normally performed with histological examination of the tumour, even if those could be anticipated considering the clinical characteristics of the patient and the radiological signs of a centrally located tumour with an infiltrative growth pattern, and the typical invasion of the renal sinus.
Most tumors are small and confined to the renal parenchyma, although rare cases extending into the renal sinus have been described.
If a well-differentiated neoplasm originates from the renal capsule or renal sinus and the tumour is hypovascular or avascular on angiograms, the diagnosis of renal sarcoma should be considered.
pT3a: Tumor grossly extends into the renal vein or its segmental (muscle containing) branches, or tumor invades perirenal and/or renal sinus fat but not beyond Gerota fascia
Additional information provided by measuring tumour proximity to the renal sinus and collecting system was small and not statistically significant.