reporting point

reporting point

[ri′pȯrd·iŋ ‚pȯint]
(navigation)
A specified point in relation to which a craft reports its position.
In air operations, a geographical point established for use by air-traffic control in the movement and separation of aircraft.

reporting point

A specified geographical location in relation to which the position of an aircraft can be reported (ICAO). A reporting may be compulsory or noncompulsory. See compulsory reporting points.
References in periodicals archive ?
Specifically, Paragraph (a) states that we are to report, as soon as possible, "The time and altitude of passing each designated reporting point, or the reporting points specified by ATC, except that while the aircraft is under radar control, only the passing of those reporting points specifically requested by ATC need by reported.
It goes on to state that the "designated reporting point symbol is a solid triangle and the 'on request' reporting point symbol is the open triangle," and that reporting on request" reporting points is only required at the request of ATC.
says to report over a compulsory reporting point when on an airway or route, even when VFR-on-top.
In these instances, "pilots must report over each reporting point used in the flight plan to define the route of flight.
not the ETA) of the next succeeding reporting point.
5 further states that "The reporting points listed in Subpart H of FAA Order 7400.
9W, better known as Air Traffic Organization Policy, is an impressive tome of nearly 1500 pages that addresses countless airspace issues; however, Subpart H mercifully represents only the last 10 pages of that work and textually lists these points, categorizing them by low and high altitude and spinning Alaska and Hawaii reporting points into their own sections.
In addition to heading Corporate Human Resources, she will be the reporting point for the staffs of Health, Environment & Safety, Social Responsibility and Information Systems, as well as the Corporate Center administration and Corporate Procurement Team.
A useful mnemonic for position reports is PTA-TEN-R: Position, Time, Altitude, Type of flight plan, ETA and name of next reporting point, the Next reporting point after that one, and any Remarks.
True or False: When receiving radar service, you still need to make position reports over compulsory reporting points.
When on a direct route not under radar service, the points that define the route are compulsory reporting points.
Once you're radar identified, there is no need to make position reports over compulsory reporting points (the black-filled symbols on the enroute charts).