Resemble

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Resemble

Be a likeness of another structure.
References in periodicals archive ?
The leaked image heavy cards also resemble Samsung's Magazine UX that was also introduced by Samsung on its new Galaxy Note Pro and Galaxy Tab Pro tablets at CES
The users said that the kettle's handle resembles Hitler's side hair part, the lid looks like his moustache and the spout resembles a Nazi salute.
The colt is emblazoned with a white star and is said to resemble his mother.
The fruit in question is not a kiwi but a feijoa that happens to resemble the flightless bird that is the national symbol of New Zealand.
Rejected by the Council of Legendary Figures for his unabashed Santa-envy, Frost resembles the Satan of Milton's ``Paradise Lost,'' a pitiful, strangely sympathetic figure whose original sin was to venture higher than his lot, thinking it better to reign in hell than serve in heaven.
The Dikika girl's hyoid resembles hyoids of living nonhuman apes, suggesting that she possessed air sacs in her neck as apes do, says coauthor Fred Spoor of University College London.
If the property more closely resembles a capital asset, it is capital; if it more closely resembles ordinary income property, it is ordinary income.
The new all-you-care-to-eat Nazareth Marketplace in Marywood's Nazareth Student Center includes My Pantry, an area that resembles a kitchen in someone's home.
The Observers": The glacier disappoints you: / it resembles (you observe, / through binoculars) not snow / but rather, soiled underwear.
Friday, April 14: McVeigh checks into the Dreamland Motel in Junction City, Kansas, and Shane Boyd, a helicopter mechanic who is staying at the motel, sees a "bushy-haired" man who resembles the government sketch of Joe Doe No.
Marijuana resembles hemp about as much as a garden rose resembles its cousin the strawberry," explains author Mark Bourrie in his new book Hemp: A Short History of the Most Misunderstood Plant and its Uses and Abuses (Firefly Books, $14.
Blocky shapes and thick lines give way to feathery, mottled brushwork that resembles Japanese ink painting more than Abstract Expressionism; as these forms become less dense and more fragmented, they yield to negative space.