Resident

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resident

1. Social welfare an occupant of a welfare agency home
2. (esp formerly) a representative of the British government in a British protectorate
3. (esp in the 17th century) a diplomatic representative ranking below an ambassador
4. (in India, formerly) a representative of the British governor general at the court of a native prince
5. a bird or other animal that does not migrate
6. US and Canadian a physician who lives in the hospital where he works while undergoing specialist training after completing his internship
7. Brit and NZ a junior doctor, esp a house officer, who lives in the hospital in which he works
8. (of birds and other animals) not in the habit of migrating

Resident

 

(in Russian, ordinator), a physician in a medical institution, such as a hospital, polyclinic, or maternity home, who is directly engaged in treatment and preventive work under the guidance of a department head. In a hospital the resident independently makes rounds of patients, performs physicians’ duties, prescribes treatment, records histories, and takes shifts on call. In a polyclinic the resident performs the functions of a district medical officer or specialist: he receives patients, prescribes treatment, fills in medical charts of ambulatory patients, issues certificates of disability, provides dispensary service, and acts as a health instructor. A clinical resident is a physician who is preparing to enter a specialty, for example, internal medicine or surgery. A clinical residency usually lasts two years in a teaching clinic, a research institute, or an institute for the advanced training of physicians; the resident also performs the duties of staff physician.


Resident

 

(rezident). (1) In the Middle Ages, a foreign diplomat residing in a given country.

(2) A representative of the metropolis residing in a protectorate.

(3) A representative of intelligence residing in a foreign state.

References in classic literature ?
The character of the higher and more educated classes who reside in the towns, partakes, but perhaps in a lesser degree, of the good parts of the Gaucho, but is, I fear, stained by many vices of which he is free.
And there will I not reside and abide where every one spitteth and speweth: that is now MY taste,--rather would I live amongst thieves and perjurers.
They reside in various boarding-houses near at hand.
The principal medical attendant resides under the same roof; and were the patients members of his own family, they could not be better cared for, or attended with greater gentleness and consideration.
He walks constantly on the terrace during the summer months, with a youthful and jaunty air, which has rendered him the admiration of the numerous elderly ladies of single condition, who reside in the vicinity.
Pickwick himself continued to reside in his new house, employing his leisure hours in arranging the memoranda which he afterwards presented to the secretary of the once famous club, or in hearing Sam Weller read aloud, with such remarks as suggested themselves to his mind, which never failed to afford Mr.
The Nantucketer, he alone resides and riots on the sea; he alone, in Bible language, goes down to it in ships; to and fro ploughing it as his own special plantation.
She is unfortunately of a sickly constitution, which has prevented her from making that progress in many accomplishments which she could not have otherwise failed of, as I am informed by the lady who superintended her education, and who still resides with them.
And so by reason of the smallest part or class, and of the knowledge which resides in this presiding and ruling part of itself, the whole State, being thus constituted according to nature, will be wise; and this, which has the only knowledge worthy to be called wisdom, has been ordained by nature to be of all classes the least.
Again, I said, there is no difficulty in seeing the nature of courage; and in what part that quality resides which gives the name of courageous to the State.
Why, because temperance is unlike courage and wisdom, each of which resides in a part only, the one making the State wise and the other valiant; not so temperance, which extends to the whole, and runs through all the notes of the scale, and produces a harmony of the weaker and the stronger and the middle class, whether you suppose them to be stronger or weaker in wisdom or power or numbers or wealth, or anything else.
The amendment introduces new rules where a foreign national s right to reside in Denmark can lapse if the individual travels abroad to a conflict area and takes part in armed conflict or the like.