bronchiole

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bronchiole

any of the smallest bronchial tubes, usually ending in alveoli

bronchiole

[′bräŋ·kē‚ōl]
(anatomy)
A small, thin-walled branch of a bronchus, usually terminating in alveoli.
References in periodicals archive ?
First-generation respiratory bronchiole with macrophages within the airway lumen and also within the adjacent alveolar airspaces (hematoxylin-eosin, original magnification x4.
The lesion consists of sharply circumscribed areas containing a mixture of emphysema and dense, distinctively hyaline paucicellular interstitial fibrosis that often appears to radiate from the region of a respiratory bronchiole to the pleura (Figure 1, A).
Species with branching respiratory bronchioles between the terminal bronchiole and alveolar ducts have more complex acini.
Respiratory bronchioles have alveoli budding from their walls, the number of which increases distally.
The pigment and birefringent particles in the walls of the respiratory bronchiole were primarily seen around the attendant pulmonary artery, but also extended into the peribronchiolar tissues and adjacent alveolar septal walls.
1) The CAP criteria require "discrete foci of fibrosis in the walls of respiratory bronchioles associated with accumulations of asbestos bodies in histological sections.
In the original article of Myers et al, (1) the major pathologic finding was the presence of RB: clusters of slightly golden colored alveolar macrophages ("smoker's macrophages") in the lumens of respiratory bronchioles, alveolar ducts, and in the surrounding alveoli.
8] Previous studies from several laboratories have shown that this airway obstruction is associated with chronic inflammatory process in the membranous and respiratory bronchioles.
The proposed pathogenesis of Swyer-James Macleod sydrome is bronchiolitis obliterans caused by respiratory infections in early childhood leading to inflammation, fibrosis and obstruction of the terminal and respiratory bronchioles, possibly preventing normal development of the alveolar bud (Figure 4).
As such, elastin fibres as a marker of necrosis of intra-alveolar septa, blood vessels and respiratory bronchioles resulting from pulmonary infection or inflammation might allow the diagnosis of lung necrosis in the absence of CT scans of the chest or overt cavitation.