care

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CARE

(Cooperative for Assistance and Relief Everywhere), nonprofit, nonsectarian federation of agencies devoted to channeling relief and self-help materials to needy people in foreign countries. Organized in the United States (1945) to help war-ravaged Europe, CARE soon expanded its program to include developing nations in Asia, Africa, and Latin America. Famous for its "CARE packages" of food and other necessities, CARE in now also involved in population, health care, land management, and small economic activity. It is now an international organization with 10 member countries and headquarters in Brussels.

care

  1. the work involved in supporting people who, because of physical frailty chronic illness or other forms of incapacity and disability, are incapable of leading an autonomous existence.
  2. other kinds of carework, e.g. in child-rearing (see CHILD CARE) and DOMESTIC LABOUR. This should be distinguished from care in sense 1.
Care in sense 1 operates over a wide range of social relations. A clear dividing line can be drawn between formal and informal care (see Abrams, 1978) as it exists in contemporary industrial societies. Formal care refers to services provided by agents of organization (statutory, voluntary and/or private) to people within clearly defined categories of need. Informal care is personally directed towards certain people who have a social relationship with their carer - usually a family member, and most often a spouse (Parker, 1993), or female relative.

Feminist sociologists (see also FEMINISM) have had a major impact on the understanding of care and caring relationships. They have argued that caring is ‘a gendered concept’ and that women constitute the majority of carers both informally, in the private sphere, and as low-paid care workers (‘care assistants’) in the formal sector (Finch and Groves, 1982; Ungerson, 1987; Lewis and Meredith, 1988). Studies of caring have examined the complex reasons why women care and the particular problems and difficulties they face. Social policies involving decarceration and COMMUNITY CARE, the decline of neighbour-hood and COMMUNITY associated with increasing SOCIAL (and geographical) MOBILITY, have placed an increasing burden on individual women carers. There is some evidence that women are reluctant to enter caring relationships with female relatives but lack viable alternatives (Cotterill, 1994). Recent research using data from the 1980 British General Household Survey has also pointed to the significant contribution made by male carers, particularly men who care for their wives (Arber and Gilbert, 1989).

care, custody, and control

Describes a standard exclusion in liability insurance policies. Under this exclusion, the liability insurance does not apply to damage to property in the care or custody of the insured, or to damage to property over which the insured is for any purpose exercising physical control.

CARE

agency devoted to channeling relief to needy people abroad. [Am. Hist.: NCE, 456]

care

in (or into) care Social welfare made the legal responsibility of a local authority by order of a court
References in periodicals archive ?
There was a statistical difference between knowledge dental hygienists demonstrated regarding restorative care being provided during pregnancy related to years since degree completion.
Little is known about the factors that impede the utilization of swing beds in CAHs for restorative care and there has been scarce research on the topic.
Resnick B, Rogers V, Galik E, Gruber-Baldini AL (2007) Measuring restorative care provided by nursing assistants: reliability and validity of the Restorative Care Behavior Checklist.
Alternatively, the ADHA proposed the ADHP model to help improve access to care and improve the dental workforce shortage by expanding roles and responsibilities in providing preventive, diagnostic, therapeutic and restorative care in less restrictive delivery systems, as endorsed by the American Dental Education Association (ADEA).
Restorative care also allows a facility to comply with the Code of Federal Regulations 42 Subpart B, Section 483.
In a recent survey however general practitioners did indicate that they considered restorative care in this age group to be important [Jensma and Veerkamp, 2010].
This edition has updated information on new infection control guidelines, family involvement in care planning, the Joint Commission and Nursing Home Surveys, ergonomics and workplace violence, post-traumatic stress disorder, substance abuse, and updated procedures, as well as two new chapters on comfort and rest and rehabilitation and restorative care and new personal stories by nursing assistants.
The top price face, scalp and back treatment (pounds 73) offers 80 minutes of restorative care, working on energy points.
The collections include Coconut & Hibiscus Curl Care (with coconut oil, silk protein and neem oil), African Black Soap Dandruff & Eczema Care (containing plantain enzyme, tea tree oil and willow bark extract), Organic Raw Shea Butter Restorative Care (with sea kelp and argan oil) and Yucca & Baobab Thickening Care (containing biotin and bamboo).
Emphasis on capacity building or restorative care to maintain or promote a client's capacity to live as independently as possible, the overall aim being to improve functional independence, quality of life and social participation.
White Foundation will take a leadership role in restoring "elderpride" by working with legislative leaders, with the media, and at the grassroots level, organizing a social and political movement for change to improve the treatment of our senior citizens, provide them with restorative care, and end elder abuse in our country.