retable


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retable

(rē`tābəl), frame for decorative panels at the back of an altar in European churches. Retables, often sumptuously decorated in alabaster and gold, generally contained scenes from the Bible. An altarpiece made of fixed panels may also be termed a retable.

Retable

 

a large screen set up behind the altar of many Latin American and Spanish churches of the 15th through 18th centuries. Often reaching as high as the ceiling, a retable consisted of a frame completely covered with sculptured figures and other sculptural ornamentation. Sometimes paintings were included. The most commonly used materials for retables were wood, alabaster, and marble.

retable

A decorative screen set up above and behind an altar, generally forming an architectural frame to a picture, bas-relief, or mosaic.
References in periodicals archive ?
As the singular force behind this, the "most important change in the idea of the altar retable as a work of art" (56), Kahsnitz the connoisseur returns us in the end to sculpture's own Kunstwollen, mediated by the ambitions of the generation's most talented carvers.
In the manner of Hans Memlinc's Retable of the Passion of Christ (Turin Pinacoteca), Cranach pictures the successive events as if they were simultaneous.
I am retable with percentages, a fact that typically benefits restaurant servers and hairstylists.
It displays one of France's most important collections of Greek antiquities, a large collection of Gallo-Roman jewelry, weaponry, and bronze (including superb fibulae), as well as a collection of fifteenth-to-nineteenth-century paintings, sculpture, and furniture (including the world-famous retable of L 'Annonciation).
Set within a former 13th-century convent - the pastoral peace of its cloisters still intact - it's the home for the spectacular Biblical work Retable d'Issenheim by the 16th-century painter Grunwald.
For example, a thirteenth- or fourteenth-century Catalan retable now in the collection of the Musee des arts decoratifs at Paris shows an anthropomorphic Saint Michael reaching out to divert the water from the woman and her child by means of a long pole or spear, thereby avoiding any direct, potentially dangerous contact between them.
Although these signs are required in a tenant's retable area, it doesn't mean that the tenant is obligated to perform and pay for the work.
Plaid Cymru and the SNP are joining forces and promising to retable the motion to impeach Prime Minister Tony Blair over the Iraq war once the General Election is over.
I am not proud of the fact that my taste in the visual arts is Philistine and must confess that my preoccupation with the Isenheim retable, and especially with what is exposed when its wings are closed, is more of a reflex from a reading of the Bible and its interpreters.
Later retable altarpieces have the benefit of physical context to insist on a singular, evangelical reading more effectively than their ancestor, Law and Gospel.
The apposition of Christ as food and Christ serving food is also made in a fifteenth-century retable (illustrated ibid.
After an extensive hospital based study on abortion conducted from November 1995 to October 1998, which proved that women all over Namibia resort to unsafe and horrendous methods to end unwanted pregnancies, Minister of Heath and Social Services, Libertine Amathila, could still not find the courage to retable the amendments (drafted in 1999) to the restrictive Abortion and Sterilisation Act of 1975.