retable


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retable

(rē`tābəl), frame for decorative panels at the back of an altar in European churches. Retables, often sumptuously decorated in alabaster and gold, generally contained scenes from the Bible. An altarpiece made of fixed panels may also be termed a retable.

Retable

 

a large screen set up behind the altar of many Latin American and Spanish churches of the 15th through 18th centuries. Often reaching as high as the ceiling, a retable consisted of a frame completely covered with sculptured figures and other sculptural ornamentation. Sometimes paintings were included. The most commonly used materials for retables were wood, alabaster, and marble.

retable

A decorative screen set up above and behind an altar, generally forming an architectural frame to a picture, bas-relief, or mosaic.
References in periodicals archive ?
La madone Sixtine de Raphael, avant d'etre ce chef-d'oeuvre de la Renaissance admire et contemple a la Gemaldegalerie de Dresde, fut le tableau d'un retable dans une chapelle de Toscane en 1514.
The chancel was thoroughly rearranged at the end of the 15th century in connection with the arrival of the altar retable, commissioned from Hermen Rode from Lybeck.
In "The Despenser Retable and 1381," Stanbury deals with social desires inscribed in the eponymous object, a fourteenth-century altarpiece that survived Reformation iconoclasm on Norwich Cathedral.
Euvre toujours en devenir, l'eglise Notre-Dame sous la cure de Monsieur Rousselot, un Francais, se pare, pres de cinquante ans apres sa construction, d'un retable de quatre-vingt pieds de haut et d'une decoration aux reflets bleus inspiree de celle de la Sainte-Chapelle recemment renovee sous le Second Empire.
70) As late as 1546-47, the Duke of Norfolk's chapel at Kenninghall contained not only an altar retable painted with "a gilded Passion of Christ sequence 'wrought upon wainscot,'" but six tapestries, "each of 9 square yards," also evocatively "depicting the story of the Passion.
Reservations about the theory that makes the early winged retable a direct descendant of the reliquary altar lead him to give equal importance to another type of retabular structure: the baldachin altar, in which a single figure or sculptural group is showcased in a shrine cabinet enclosed by folding wings.
Outside his house, I asked Retable if he had ever considered not coming back.
If the climate is favourable', it might also retable the working time directive and reach political agreement on the supplementary pension rights' directive, based on the new European Commission proposal, and tie up one or two chapters on the future regulation on the application of social security schemes.
In the manner of Hans Memlinc's Retable of the Passion of Christ (Turin Pinacoteca), Cranach pictures the successive events as if they were simultaneous.
I am retable with percentages, a fact that typically benefits restaurant servers and hairstylists.
It displays one of France's most important collections of Greek antiquities, a large collection of Gallo-Roman jewelry, weaponry, and bronze (including superb fibulae), as well as a collection of fifteenth-to-nineteenth-century paintings, sculpture, and furniture (including the world-famous retable of L 'Annonciation).
Set within a former 13th-century convent - the pastoral peace of its cloisters still intact - it's the home for the spectacular Biblical work Retable d'Issenheim by the 16th-century painter Grunwald.