clinic

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Related to retail clinic: Convenient care clinic

clinic,

name for an institution providing medical diagnosis and treatment for ambulatory patients. The forerunner of the modern clinic was the dispensary, which dispensed free drugs and served only those who could not afford to pay a fee. Dispensaries began to appear in London toward the end of the 17th cent. In the United States the first dispensary was founded in Philadelphia in 1786 through the efforts of Benjamin RushRush, Benjamin,
1745?–1813, American physician, signer of the Declaration of Independence, b. Byberry (now part of Philadelphia), Pa., grad. College of New Jersey (now Princeton), 1760, M.D. Univ. of Edinburgh, 1768.
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. Another was established in New York City in 1791, and one in Boston in 1796. Home care was often provided by the early clinics, but later they evolved as places for treatment of those who could visit them. As the clinic movement grew and concern for public health increased, facilities for providing diagnosis and treatment improved. Present-day clinics are maintained by private and city hospitals, by city health departments, by industrial and labor organizations, and by groups of private physicians. Some clinics specialize in vaccination and other measures to prevent infectious disease. Some are established to promote the health of babies and mothers. Others exist to facilitate the diagnosis of tuberculosis or cancer so that these diseases may be treated as early as possible. There are also clinics concerned with mental health. Clinics designated as health centers offer all the health services that are considered essential. They provide free, comprehensive service for people who cannot afford private care. In some areas mobile units travel from place to place providing various kinds of medical and dental care. Clinics maintained by industrial and labor organizations are often free for members, but others charge a nominal fee; in hospital clinics the fee is usually based on the individual's ability to pay.

Clinic

A medical facility; independent or part of a hospital in which ambulatory patients receive diagnostic and therapeutic medical and surgical care.

Clinic

 

an inpatient medical institution in which treatment of patients is combined with medical research and teaching (the instruction of students and the advanced training of physicians) in various branches of practical medicine and clinical disciplines, including surgery, obstetrics, and pediatrics. In the USSR, medical research institutes and institutions of higher learning either have their own clinics or use the facilities of municipal hospitals or medical-preventive institutions (such hospitals and medical-preventive institutions are called clinical or clinics). Clinics in other socialist countries are organized on similar principles. Capitalist countries have university clinics; private hospitals, depending chiefly on a prosperous clientele, are also called clinics.

clinic

1. A facility, independent or part of a hospital, in which ambulatory patients receive diagnostic and therapeutic medical and surgical care.
2. Single-focus or general-purpose units of the entire facility, such as the cardiac clinic or the pediatric clinic.

clinic

1. a place in which outpatients are given medical treatment or advice, often connected to a hospital
2. a similar place staffed by physicians or surgeons specializing in one or more specific areas
3. Brit a private hospital or nursing home
4. Obsolete the teaching of medicine to students at the bedside
5. US a place in which medical lectures are given
6. US a clinical lecture
References in periodicals archive ?
PeaceHealth's retail clinic in the south Eugene Market of Choice store, which also serves Market of Choice employees, sees an average of 10 patients a day, Ash said.
17) From its modest start, QuickMedX grew to become MinuteClinic, which is now wholly owned by CVS and is the leader in the retail clinic industry.
Total costs over 12 months were $1,236 for the retail clinic, $1,435 for the physician office, and $2,157 for the emergency department.
But while some praise the emergence of retail clinics as a valuable response to consumer demand for quick, easy, health care, others say they are concerned about the quality, or that consumers will come to rely on retail clinics as their permanent medical home.
But we've also seen this statistic of high physician usage among retail clinic users over four years of doing these surveys.
If most of the new retail clinics and urgent care clinics are opening in high-income areas, rather than in low-income areas or other areas where people have a hard time getting health care outside the emergency room, that might explain why an increase in the number of retail clinics in a community had little effect on emergency room use, the researchers say.
Care provision is currently in the process of shifting from hospitals to ambulatory care providers; notably retail clinics, urgent care centers and ambulatory surgical centers.
Retail clinic company CVS MinuteClinic said on Tuesday that it has surpassed 20m patient visits since opening the nation's first store-based clinic in 2000.
Retail clinic customers said that they liked the appointment-free service and expanded hours--especially when compared with the average physician's office, according to the survey.
Based on data from the nation's three largest retail clinic operators--MinuteClinic, Take Care and Little Clinic--researchers found that nearly two-thirds of retail clinic customers do not have a primary care doctor.