revenue cutter


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revenue cutter

[′rev·ə‚nü ‚kəd·ər]
(naval architecture)
A ship used by the government mainly for enforcement of revenue laws and prevention of smuggling.
References in periodicals archive ?
Critique: An impressive work of original and collaborative research, "Steaming to the North: The First Summer Cruise of the US Revenue Cutter Bear, Alaska and Chukotka, Siberia, 1886" by Katherine C.
Muir, who understood food chain relationships of marine mammals and did not approve of trophy hunting, was aboard the Revenue Cutter Corwin as a guest scientist when it was in the pack ice near Wrangell Island.
Revenue Cutter Service (a precursor to today's Coast Guard).
Healy (1839-1904) traces his life and career in the US Revenue Cutter Service, from his childhood, when his parents sent him north to escape slavery, to passing for white and becoming a sailor.
A painting called A Revenue Cutter on the Clyde by Robert Salmon (1826) shows a cutter approaching a newly-arrived vessel to check for diseases.
The Revenue Cutter Service, the forebearer of today's Coast, was created by one of the first acts of Congress on August 4, 1790.
The service, and Kimball, continue on until 1915, when President Woodrow Wilson signs into law the "Act to Create the Coast Guard," merging the service and the Revenue Cutter Service.
Sailing Navy has chapters for the Continental and state navies, and also the Revenue Cutter Service and Texas Navy, as well as the U.
But its antecedents date to 1790, when the Coast Guard's predecessor - the Revenue Cutter Service - was granted equally broad authority to board vessels at sea.
This 145-foot topsail schooner is a replica of an 1848 revenue cutter and one of the biggest wooden sailing ships on the West Coast.
It combined the Revenue Cutter Service, which had been established in 1790, with the more recent Life Saving Service.