revivalism

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Related to revivalistic: Revivalist movement

revivalism

a movement, esp an evangelical Christian one, that seeks to reawaken faith
References in periodicals archive ?
The works cited in n1 above give credit to the black church as an institution and black religion as a tradition, but do not consider the revivalistic pattern of collective enthusiasm, or the historical precedents for such waves of enthusiasm in white as well as black churches.
Chapter 3, the final chapter of the first section of the book, describes the advent of the individual as mediated by theological innovations, many of which the author associates with the revivalistic tendencies of the likes of Whitefield and, especially, Jonathan Edwards.
Krupat claims that "even had Neihardt somehow been willing and able to grasp and to credit the continuous nature of Black EIk's revivalistic efforts, he could not have structurally represented them in narrative" (1985, 129).
In "The Chanted Sermon," Raboteau locates the performed word within "a traditional [European] genre" whose origins stretch back to the eighteenth century: "Africans and their descendants in Protestant America discovered analogues in revivalistic Evangelicalism to the religious beliefs and rituals of Africa, which turned out to be crucial for the process of reinterpretation that made Christianity intelligible and adaptable for large numbers of African-Americans.
In the spring of 1739, on the eve of his second revivalistic tour of England's burgeoning American colonies, Whitefield persuaded Wesley to take his place preaching in the fields outside Bristol, England.
In keeping with his earlier rejection of High Calvinism and his conversionistic preaching, Winchester could be characterized as a revivalistic universalist.
As so much of the scholarship shows, the Puritan awakening, as it unfolded in England and subsequently in the American colonies, gave birth to the kind of revivalistic spirit and fervor that made the First and Second Great Awakenings possible.
There may be traces of an original evangelical spirituality in this suspicion, akin to the revivalistic mistrust of all ecclesial establishment.
Fuller's views found their way to America, where coupled with revivalistic zeal and democratic idealism some Baptists constructed confessional rationale for modifying classic Calvinism enough to vindicate missionary activity and mass conversionism.
By a close analysis of the texts, brief and conflicting as they are, and by carefully placing the events of 1212 in a context of revivalistic religion, Dickson gives us a breakthrough interpretation of the Children's Crusade.
It is somewhat surprising, however, that the conscience is disarmed at the height of Aunt Mary's revivalistic rhetoric.
Revivals and revivalistic practices helped Baptists and other Protestants discern the need for conversion and discover the means for experiencing it.