revivalism

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Related to revivalistic: Revivalist movement

revivalism

a movement, esp an evangelical Christian one, that seeks to reawaken faith
References in periodicals archive ?
Freemasonry's "sublime science" was, like phrenology, a "nonsectarian school of virtue" that exercised moral discipline on its members in ways that mimicked revivalistic techniques, with a reworked conception of morality that shifted the emphasis from mere self-presentation and outer conformity to inner character and its progressive development.
Perhaps they are capturing different motifs (Lofland & Skonovd, 1981) of spiritual transformations; first-time commitment to God may signal a revivalistic transformation whereas change in spirituality may signal an affectional transformation.
The collection titled Anokhee boasts of classic, trendy and revivalistic Indian fashion, inspired by an interesting mix of the contemporary fashions and the handicraft works of the Indian villages.
Some became highly esteemed healers, and a few Porno women took leading roles as Dreamers in the revivalistic Bole Maru religious movement that began in the winter of 1871-72.
There he would gently but in a no-nonsense manner engage in theological table talk that challenged the far more conservative, literalistic, and even revivalistic Anglo pastors, who seemed intent on making their youths' camp experience one in which success would be counted by the number who had "given their hearts" to Jesus by "making a decision for Christ.
revivalistic phenomena must look elsewhere, though this case is
The revivalistic spirituality of Pentecostalism, which is an interesting mixture of Anabaptist, Wesleyan-Holiness, and Catholic heritages, focuses on the inner transformation of the person as the key to social transformation.
76) The revivalistic Methodists, exuding untamed religious experiences in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth century, were less than 0.
Discussing this distinction for a wide range of American progressive reform activities, Crunden pointed out that "Given the revivalistic way in which many progressive reforms came into existence, it was perhaps only natural that there should be something of a moral hangover after the preacher left town and the new converts had to go about the duller business of daily living" (Crunden, 1982, p.
Rooted in the revivalistic paradigm of Alline--who almost single-handedly guided the First Great Awakening in Nova Scotia from 1777 to 1783--these three groups drew on a rich spiritual past that stressed conversionism, revivalism, religious experience, and antiformalism.
But the deliverance must come in as strong a form as the complaint, if it is to take effect; and that seems a reason why the coarser religions, revivalistic, orgiastic, with blood and miracles and supernatural operations, may possibly never be displaced.
What is most striking about the Civil Rights Movement of the 1950s and 1960s is that its revivalistic forms and tendencies were often obvious to the participants--ministers and laypersons alike--and remain prominent in their memories.