rewrite


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rewrite

[′rē‚rīt]
(computer science)
The process of restoring a storage device to its state prior to reading; used when the information-storing state may be destroyed by reading.
References in periodicals archive ?
The purpose of this request for proposal is to enter into a contract with a qualified firm to rewrite the Police Departments security alarm computers existing Theos operating system.
We rewrite for a content aggregation company based in New York.
If your tech person says, "This part broke, so I'm going to rewrite the whole thing," don't let him or her do that.
Rewrite man wrote story about a burglar breaking into a front bedroom and frightening a girl sleeping in the middle bedroom.
The course instructor provided two types of feedback: (1) errors were identified and corrected and (2) specific strengths and weaknesses were highlighted and suggestions for revision and rewrite enumerated.
Pomfret: Honestly, that almost made me weep, to be able to rewrite that scene and to set it in our own state, with history getting ahead of what we are doing.
a Roman Catholic Jesuit school, took another step to further the inclusion of gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender students this spring when it agreed to rewrite its welcoming statement of nondiscrimination.
After the season, Peter Farrelly received a Christmas card from Red Sox principal owner John Henry, saying, ``When I first read your script, I thought the ending was just so-so, so I worked to get you a rewrite.
4x DVD+R DL, 4x rewrite DVD+RW, 16x read DVD-ROM), but also in CD creation (40x write CD-R, 24x rewrite CD, 40x read CD-ROM) making it today's most versatile high-performance storage device integrated in standard PCs.
They've also looked into ways to write and rewrite information to dense, thermally stable materials--a major challenge because of the large magnetic fields currently required.
Caroline Rody's The Daughter's Return importantly links these two themes to provide a compelling examination of how recent African American and Caribbean women writers return to the past in order to rewrite it.
Then Goldberg presents Elizabeth Gary's Mariam, arguing that "part of the way in which Gary seeks to rewrite women in this play has to do with her support of values that are exclusively associated with male-male relationships" (186).