Rhetorical Devices

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Rhetorical Devices

 

expressive stylistic locutions that are historically evolved means of organizing a sentence and that utilize chiefly the emotional and imperative qualities of speech; an obsolete term for figures of speech. In a narrow sense, the term applies to three figures of speech: rhetorical exclamation, rhetorical appeal, and rhetorical question (a statement in the form of a question).

References in periodicals archive ?
Using the pathos rhetorical device, it is implied that the demonic character of environmentalists leads them to prey on the innocent (children) and disregard the helpless (impoverished).
The Israelis don't really think Abbas is responsible, it's a rhetorical device.
To analyse the 'White Heat' speech, I use three classical rhetorical devices as identified by Aristotle, namely ethos, pathos, and logos:
Pragmatic dependents, the last rhetorical device category, is probably the first to come to mind as ambiguous.
He employs every rhetorical device, devastating opponents with ridicule, cleverly undermining their reasoning.
He repeatedly and, in my opinion, quite effectively demonstrates that calling such men "illiterate" was a rhetorical device, not a description.
This constituted a useful rhetorical device and means of coordination between the President and Congress over budget issues, once the President and a working majority in Congress agreed that they wanted deficit reduction--but PAYGO was also tossed aside when changing circumstances (and a changed President and Congress) led to less desire for deficit reduction.
Welty correctly identifies this as pretentious and prejudiced humbuggery whose main rhetorical device is question begging.
His apparent reliance on Roman models is to be understood fundamentally as a rhetorical device designed to appeal to the prejudices of the humanist-oriented Italian elite of his day.
IRONY, AS A RHETORICAL DEVICE, is rarely encountered in speeches nowadays, especially at financial or advisor meetings.
Word Ways readers may recall that Mardy Grothe published in 1999 Never Let a Fool Kiss You or a Kiss Fool You, a celebration of the rhetorical device known as chiasmus.
Indeed, their critique of socialism was a useful rhetorical device that earned them credibility among France's more conservative elite.