Rhetorician


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Rhetorician

 

(rhetor). (1) In ancient Greece and Rome, an orator, especially one whose oratory was not so much practical as for show. Rhetoricians included teachers and students at schools of rhetoric.

(2) In Russia in the 18th and 19th centuries, a pupil in the third of five classes at a religious seminary. The five classes were infimum (that is, primary grade), grammar, rhetoric, philosophy, and theology.

References in periodicals archive ?
The rhetorician Quintillian said of his odes: "He can be lofty sometimes, yet he is also full of charm and grace, versatile in his figures and felicitiously daring in his choice of words.
In an online article headlined: "In Memoriam: Christopher Hitchens, 1949-2011," the magazine described him as an "incomparable critic, masterful rhetorician, fiery wit, and fearless bon vivant.
On the magazine's website, its editor Graydon Carter remembers Hitchens, describing him as a "brilliant wit, matchless rhetorician, and masterful critic.
So described, they are capable of being misdirected and misused: a rhetorician can give clever arguments for a bad cause; he can calculatively and deliberately act harmfully.
20) A minor rhetorician is "a physician, the physician of himself and of the world.
Beneath that, there's a 'Wise Words' quote from the Roman rhetorician and writer Seneca the Elder (c.
It's not unusual for a skilled rhetorician like Paul to shift gears.
In chapter six, Arnaudo introduces another prominent Seicento figure: Daniello Bartoli (1608-1685), the official historian of the Jesuit order and one of the best rhetorician of the century.
Firstly, linking the position of the rhetorician to socialism ('red'), thus depicting their position as more socialist ('redder')--or simply as socialist--in comparison to the policy position (real or abstract) chosen on the other side of the 'water' (e.
Disraeli once declared of Gladstone: "He is a sophistical rhetorician, inbraited by the exuberance of his own verbosity.
The first two essays consider early rhetorician texts: the fourteenth-century Maastricht Passion Play written in the Ripuarian dialect and the fifteenth-century Bliscapen texts on the Joys of Mary.
Part 1, for example, provides a strong critique of works that focus on Calvin as rhetorician, and which subsequently downplay the dialectical and contemplative aspects of his work.