Ribaldry


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Related to Ribaldry: bawdy

Ribaldry

Ridicule (See MOCKERY.)
Decameron, The
Boccaccio’s bawdy panorama of medieval Italian life. [Ital. Lit.: Bishop, 314–315, 380]
Droll Tales
Balzac’s Rabelaisian stories, told in racy medieval style and frequently gross. [Fr. Lit.: Contes Drolatiques in Benét, 222]
Fescennia
Etrurian town noted for jesting and scurrilous verse (Fescennine verse). [Rom. Hist.: EB, TV: 112]
Gargantua and Pantagruel
Rabelais’s farcical and obscene 16th-century novel. [Fr. Lit.: Magill I, 298]
Golden Ass, The
tale of Lucius and his asininity, with a number of bawdy episodes. [Rom. Lit.: Apuleius Metamorphoses or The Golden Ass in Magill I, 309]
Goliards
scholar-poets interested mainly in earthly delights. [Medieval Hist.: Bishop, 292–293]
Iambe
girl who amused Demeter with bawdy stories. [Gk. Myth.: Howe, 136]
LaFontaine, The Tales of
ribald stories in verse, adapted from Boccaccio and others. [Fr. Lit.: Contes en Vers in Benét, 222]
Miller’s Tale, The
lusty story told by the drunken Miller. [Br. Lit.: Canterbury Tales in Magill II, 131]
Reeve’s Tale, The
Oswald the Reeve retaliates in kind to The Miller’s Tale. [Br. Lit.: Canterbury Tales in Benét, 919]
References in periodicals archive ?
A typical Nigerian comedy or comedy show is usually a mixture of the obvious entertainment value, and the normal day-to-day ribaldry which also, simultaneously, adopts a moralising dimension.
Amid this raucous ribaldry, Busy enters from the audience and squares himself center stage in direct puritanical opposition to the puppet Dionysius.
For between his work on Rimbaud's frequently unconscious or semi-conscious ribaldry and the Surrealists' automatic production of comical associations, there is little doubt that, like Freud, he knew better than most that far more goes on in a text and in speech than first meets the eye or ear.
One had to be able to perform one's role, following the King's lead, switching quickly from piety to ribaldry.
He abhorres such Writers, and their Workes, and hath professed himselfe an enemie to all such as stuffe their Scenes with ribaldry, and lard their lines with scurrilous taunts and jests.
The teasing, kidding, occasional ribaldry and camaraderie were contagious.
That these drawings were made while he underwent intensive psychotherapy, for example, goes some way toward accounting for their freewheeling, free-associative ribaldry.
There's only so much coarse ribaldry about her ridiculously inflated boobs you want on a Sunday morning.
This results in some queasy moments, particularly in the closing, celebratory reading of the pseudo-Laurentian carnival song (177-81), where we are encouraged to revel unequivocally in the life-enhancing ribaldry of a poem that turns on an analogy between heterosexual sex and the purging of a cesso with a piombino, or plunger.
She still has, as she puts it, "a touch of MS (multiple sclerosis)," but Garr faces the disease -- and other health-related setbacks -- with the same wit, humor and off-the-cuff ribaldry.
Even in private, Voltaire--whose ribaldry is well documented--could only just bring himself to insinuate the 'b-word', through use of the euphemistic 'b .