ridge


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Related to ridge: ridge roof

ridge

1. a long narrow raised land formation with sloping sides esp one formed by the meeting of two faces of a mountain or of a mountain buttress or spur
2. Anatomy any elongated raised margin or border on a bone, tooth, tissue membrane, etc.
3. 
a. the top of a roof at the junction of two sloping sides
b. (as modifier): a ridge tile
4. the back or backbone of an animal, esp a whale
5. Meteorol an elongated area of high pressure, esp an extension of an anticyclone

ridge

(scarp) See lobate ridge; wrinkle ridges.

Ridge

The horizontal lines at the junction of the upper edges of two sloping roof structures.

Ridge

 

a linearly extended upland, often with soft, rounded parts. Ridges are usually the remnants of mountain ranges that have been greatly eroded and then slightly uplifted (for example, the Timan Ridge and the Donets Ridge).

ridge

[rij]
(architecture)
The line on which the sides of a sloping roof meet.
(geology)
An elongate, narrow, steep-sided elevation of the earth's surface or the ocean floor.
(meteorology)
An elongated area of relatively high atmospheric pressure, almost always associated with, and most clearly identified as, an area of maximum anticyclonic curvature of wind flow. Also known as wedge.

ridge

1. The horizontal line at the junction of the upper edges of two sloping roof surfaces.
2. The internal angle or nook of a vault.
References in classic literature ?
Elated with the success which had so far attended our enterprise, and invigorated by the refreshing atmosphere we now inhaled, Toby and I in high spirits were making our way rapidly along the ridge, when suddenly from the valleys below which lay on either side of us we heard the distant shouts of the natives, who had just descried us, and to whom our figures, brought in bold relief against the sky, were plainly revealed.
However, we thought it as well to make the most of our time; and accordingly, where the ground would admit of it, we ran swiftly along the summit of the ridge, until we were brought to a stand by a steep cliff, which at first seemed to interpose an effectual barrier to our farther advance.
About noon we began the tedious ascent of the Peuquenes ridge, and then for the first time experienced some little difficulty in our respiration.
On each side of the ridge, we had to pass over broad bands of perpetual snow, which were now soon to be covered by a fresh layer.
The pass takes its name of Portillo, from a narrow cleft or doorway on the highest ridge, through which the road passes.
While the granitic summits of the Rocky Mountains are bleak and bare, many of the inferior ridges are scantily clothed with scrubbed pines, oaks, cedar, and furze.
As Clayton turned his eyes in the direction she indicated, he saw silhouetted dimly against the shadows beyond, a great figure standing upright upon the ridge.
The ladders were now applied, and mounted by several men; which the monkey observing, and finding himself almost encompassed, not being able to make speed enough with his three legs, let me drop on a ridge tile, and made his escape.
I increased my pace, and after some time came to a slight ridge, crossed it, and turned sharply, regarding it steadfastly from the further side.
On they rode, and on, until, at last, topping a ridge, they looked down upon the fateful valley.
And Mare Crisium contains a single ridge about 20 to 30 miles from its western shore, and another one nearly in the mare center.
If you're unfamiliar with the ridge, which stretches between Buck Mountain and Mount Tom, you can see it, and a map of it, at: www.